Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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Promising Practices for Landlord Engagement and Retention in Mitigating Tenancy Risk in the Mental Health and Addications Sector
By Craig Rutherford, Completed for: HKPR Regional HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -, This report has two main purposes. The first is to identify which social service providers are involved in finding rental accommodation for clients and determining the challenges which are faced by these organizations as a consequence of landlord’s concerns about renting to marginalized individuals. The second is to identify the approaches social service providers use to mitigate these landlord concerns to create best practice recommendations for the Haliburton- Kawartha Lakes-Pine Ridge (HKPR) region. Research was completed using an extensive and thorough literature review, email fact-finding and an online survey. Findings from this research included the identification of organizations within the HKPR region that work in housing and with individuals who are marginalized. The mitigation methods these organizations use such as rent supplements, arranging for repairs, and paying for damaged property to mitigate different landlord concerns were also identified. The main concerns landlords have are non-payment of rent, damaged property, and neighborhood. Innovative programs such as RentSmart Ontario and the critical role these programs play is highlighted in addition to new adaptations on the previously established Housing First ideology with the Tiny Homes program.
Promising Practices for Landlord Engagement and Retention in Mitigating Tenancy Risk in the Mental Health and Addications Sector [poster]
By Craig Rutherford, Completed for: HKPR Regional HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
Promising Practices for Landlord Engagement and Retention in Mitigating Tenancy Risk in the Mental Health and Addications Sector [presentation]
By Craig Rutherford, Completed for: HKPR Regional HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
Peterborough Community Support Court: An Evaluation of Recidivism
By Nhu Nguyen, Completed for: Peterborough Local HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Julia Bakker; Trent Community Research Centre, PSYC 4901H / CAST 4813H -
Peterborough Community Support Court: An Evaluation of Recidivism [poster]
By Nhu Nguyen, Completed for: Peterborough Local HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Julia Bakker; Trent Community Research Centre, PSYC 4901H / CAST 4813H -
Peterborough Community Support Court: An Evaluation of Recidivism [presentation]
By Nhu Nguyen, Completed for: Peterborough Local HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Julia Bakker; Trent Community Research Centre, PSYC 4901H / CAST 4813H -
Accessibility in Downtown Peterborough Businesses
By Kathleen Walkter & Shannon Shillinglaw, Completed for: Big IDeA; Supervising Professor: Mark Skinner; Trent Community Research Centre, GEOG 4030 -, This summary is a synthesis of our project and the main outcomes we have discovered through our research. The attitudes and decisions of Downtown Peterborough Business Owners in relation to disability accessibility and inclusion were explored. We conducted our study on the stores that were accessible from the sidewalk on George and Charlotte Street. Our research design consisted of a literature review of accessibility legislation and scholarly sources to help inform and analyze our research. We conducted a stakeholder consultation with the Council for Peoples with Disabilities to hear their perspectives and experiences with Downtown Peterborough businesses. Thirty-six surveys from a variety of Downtown Peterborough businesses were collected and interviews with four business owners were conducted. Through our research design we were able to determine many findings about accessibility in Downtown Peterborough.
Accessibility in Downtown Peterborough Businesses [poster]
By Kathleen Walkter & Shannon Shillinglaw, Completed for: Big IDeA; Supervising Professor: Mark Skinner; Trent Community Research Centre, GEOG 4030 -
Turtle Admission Records Analysis for Identifying High Risk Locations and Analyzing the Value of Ecopassages
By Lilliam Hamlin, Completed for: Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre; Supervising Professor: Julian Aherne; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -, The purpose of this research was to assist the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre (OTCC) in analyzing their intake records and identifying the locations and details of mitigation measures that have been implemented in the province to reduce the mortality of turtles on roads. This project was complete by analyzing and mapping four years (2014–2017) of OTCC intake records to determine patterns of turtle mortality. Climate data, including temperature and precipitation, was also compared to determine potential drivers for the trends that arose in intake numbers. Through interviews conducted with individuals and organizations, locations of ecopassages were determined, and then examined to discuss their effectiveness. The results indicate that 84% of the turtles brought into the OTCC have been hit by cars, and that in 2017 the intake totals for the OTCC more than doubled. It is predicted that a decrease in precipitation in 2016, may have resulted in a population rebound when seasonal weather returned in 2017. In addition, a growing awareness about the OTCC appears to be a significant factor in these trends, as the spatial distribution of turtles in the OTCC intake records has increased by 16 km on average, and over 40,000 km in total over the past four years. In regards to mitigation measures, 80 different locations were identified and the features and effectiveness of these structures were discussed through a comparison with literature. It is recommended moving forward that the OTCC continue to monitor annual intake patterns and compile the locations of ecopassages in the province. It is evident that turtle populations are suffering as a result of habitat fragmentation from the development of road networks. The information presented in this project will help the OTCC become better prepared for years to come, and also assist in improving the communication and collaboration among stakeholders to increase the conservation of turtle populations in Ontario.
Turtle Admission Records Analysis for Identifying High Risk Locations and Analyzing the Value of Ecopassages [poster]
By Lilliam Hamlin, Completed for: Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre; Supervising Professor: Julian Aherne; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -
How Much Can We Grow? Determining a Best Method to Measure Sidewalk/Frontyard/Backyard Garden Harvests
By Jennifer Boesche, Completed for: Nourish; Supervising Professor: Stephanie Rutherford; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -, Food insecurity is becoming a growing issue within the city of Peterborough. Food insecurity can be generally defined as having a lack of physical and economic access to an adequate quantity of both affordable and nutritious food. Nourish is a non-profit organization in Peterborough which seeks to improve food security within the Peterborough community by determining a single method which can be used to measure local homegrown garden harvests, in a project known as “How Much Can We Grow”. Information that can be collected from the chosen method is significant as it can help determine to what extent homegrown gardens are contributing to improving food security within the area, and encourage more individuals to become involved with gardening in the future. The following report will discuss the research results for the project and will cover the social benefits of gardening, motivations for gardening, and a single method that can be applied to the Peterborough area for measuring garden harvests. These results are based primarily on local survey responses, for a survey which was distributed throughout the Peterborough community.
How Much Can We Grow? Determining a Best Method to Measure Sidewalk/Frontyard/Backyard Garden Harvests [poster]
By Jennifer Boesche, Completed for: Nourish; Supervising Professor: Stephanie Rutherford; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -

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