Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

Pages

Trent University course inventory
The Trent University Course Inventory Project (TUCI) was conducted on behalf of the Trent Centre for Community Based Education (TCCBE) during the 2007-2008 academic year to inventory all current and 'on the horizon' courses at Trent, to determine to what extent the community contexts of research, teaching, and learning were addressed within existing university course offerings. The author of this project worked on the TUCI project, as a student researcher to choose and design a research tool., by Ned Struthers. --, Includes: project report and appendices., Date of project submission: April 2008., POST 487 ; Politics, Community-Based Research Project., [Completed for]: Trent Centre for Community-Based Education ; Supervising Professor: Nadine Changfoot, Trent University.
Trent University divestment from the fossil fuel industry
by Julian Tennent-Riddell., Date of Project Submission: April 2014., Completed for: Sustainable Trent & OPIRG ; Supervising Professor: Ian Attridge & Rick Lindgren ; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliography., ERST 325H / ERST 4250H.
Trent Valley Literacy Association report
by: Lindsay Moreau, Heather O'Neill. --, Includes: proposed student intake form; final report., Completed for: Trent Valley Literacy Association; Professor: Molly Westland, Trent University, Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Date of project completion: March 30, 2004., Includes bibliographic references., BSc Nursing.
Trent Vegetable Gardens' ecological irrigation project
Aimee Blyth, the coordinator of Trent Vegetable gardens and student volunteers, are currently collecting rainwater in barrels to irrigate a small 1 acre garden at Trent University. Using this method, they do not collect enough water to irrigate the garden during periods without rain., Section 1: Introduction. Purpose. Importance of ecological irrigation. The current irrigation situation. About ecological irrigation. Key research goals. Major research findings -- Section 2: Water requirements -- Section 3: Options: Securing an adequate supply of water. Rainwater harvesting. Table 1: Average summer rainfall. Well water. Otonabee River. Pond -- Section 4: Options: Pumping water. Windmill pumping systems. Solar pumping systems. Sling pumping. Treadle pumping. Traditional diesel pump powered by vegetable oil -- Section 5: Options: Distribution. Drip irrigation. Pressurized drip irrigation. Gravity drip irrigation -- Section 6: Summary of research findings and recommendations. Water requirements. Securing an adequate supply of water. Pumping water. Distribution. Table 2: Estimated costs, major advantages, and major disadvantages of water options. Table 2: Continued. Table 3: Estimated costs, major advantages and major disadvantages of pumping options. Table 3: Continued. Table 4: Estimated costs, major advantages and major disadvantages of distribution options. Recommendations -- Section 7: References -- Appendices., by: Ryan Ogilvie and Bryce Sharpe., Date of Project Completion: December 2008., Completed for Trent Vegetable Gardens; Supervising Professor: Paula Anderson, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliographical references and appendices., ERST 334H, Environmental Resource Studies Department.
Trent Wildlife Sanctuary
Camp Kawartha Environment Centre is a not-for-profit charitable organization dedicated to educating the public of Peterborough County on the importance of environmental education, sustainable living and alternative energy. The educators of the Environment Centre have requested that secondary research be compiled on the Trent Wildlife Sanctuary, the section of land that surrounds the facility., Acknowledgements -- Abstract -- Keywords -- Introduction -- Methods -- Analysis -- Results -- Recommendations -- Conclusion -- References., Amanda Downard. --, Includes bibliographic references., Forensics 4890Y: Community-Based Education Research Project.
Trent gardens soil fertility evaluation
By: Kirsten Thomson, Completed for: Trent (Vegetable) Gardens; Supervising Professor: Tom Hutchinson, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliographic references., ERST 4830: Community-Based Research Project.
Trent students against sweatshops action kit
by Hala Zabaneh. --, Completed for: Ontario Public Interest Research Group (OPIRG); Professor Margaret Hobbs, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliographic references., WMST 482: Community Research Placement.
Turtle Admission Records Analysis for Identifying High Risk Locations and Analyzing the Value of Ecopassages
By Lilliam Hamlin, Completed for: Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre; Supervising Professor: Julian Aherne; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -, The purpose of this research was to assist the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre (OTCC) in analyzing their intake records and identifying the locations and details of mitigation measures that have been implemented in the province to reduce the mortality of turtles on roads. This project was complete by analyzing and mapping four years (2014–2017) of OTCC intake records to determine patterns of turtle mortality. Climate data, including temperature and precipitation, was also compared to determine potential drivers for the trends that arose in intake numbers. Through interviews conducted with individuals and organizations, locations of ecopassages were determined, and then examined to discuss their effectiveness. The results indicate that 84% of the turtles brought into the OTCC have been hit by cars, and that in 2017 the intake totals for the OTCC more than doubled. It is predicted that a decrease in precipitation in 2016, may have resulted in a population rebound when seasonal weather returned in 2017. In addition, a growing awareness about the OTCC appears to be a significant factor in these trends, as the spatial distribution of turtles in the OTCC intake records has increased by 16 km on average, and over 40,000 km in total over the past four years. In regards to mitigation measures, 80 different locations were identified and the features and effectiveness of these structures were discussed through a comparison with literature. It is recommended moving forward that the OTCC continue to monitor annual intake patterns and compile the locations of ecopassages in the province. It is evident that turtle populations are suffering as a result of habitat fragmentation from the development of road networks. The information presented in this project will help the OTCC become better prepared for years to come, and also assist in improving the communication and collaboration among stakeholders to increase the conservation of turtle populations in Ontario.
Turtle Admission Records Analysis for Identifying High Risk Locations and Analyzing the Value of Ecopassages [poster]
By Lilliam Hamlin, Completed for: Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre; Supervising Professor: Julian Aherne; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -
Understanding and creating accessible playgrounds
The purpose of this project is understand and explain the importance of accessibility within a playspace in order to produce a resource guide on how to create a new accessible playground, or update an existing playground., Abstract -- Acknowledgements -- Table of contents -- Table of tables & figures -- 1. Introduction. 1.1 Purpose. 1.2 Overview of approach. 1.3 How this project is geographically situated. 1.4 Key terms. 1.5 Structure of the report -- 2. Literature review. 2.1 An ableist culture. 2.2 Barriers to accessibility. 2.3 Financial considerations. 2.4 Effects of inaccessibility. 2.5 Elements of integration. 2.6 Equipment and standards. 2.7 Discussion -- Methodology. 3.1 Study area. 3.2 Environmental scan. 3.3 Interviews. 3.4 Playground audits -- 4. Results. 4.1 Environmental scan. 4.2 Interviews. 4.3 Playground audits -- 5. Discussion. 5.1 Importance of play. 5.2 Barrier-free society. 5.3 Sources of founding. 5.4 Understanding barriers to accessibility. 5.5 Limitations to the study. 5.6 Contributions to research. 5.7 Concluding comments -- 6. References -- Appendices., by: Lindsay Morey & Lindsay Taylor. --, Completed for: Deb Heslinga at the Peterborough Victoria Northumberland School Board; Supervisor: Mark Skinner, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-based education., Date of project submission: April 2008., Includes bibliographic references (p. 50-52)., GEOG 470, Geography, Community-Based Research in Human Geography.
Understanding integration of biodiversity into post-secondary curricula
By: J. McCallum, P. Elliot, T. McIntosh, Date of Project Submission: December 2014., Completed for: Ontario Biodiversity Council; Supervising Professor: Paul Elliot; Trent Community Research Centre, No course - paid research internship
Understanding integration of biodiversity into post-secondary curricula [poster]
By: J. McCallum, P. Elliot, T. McIntosh, Date of Project Submission: December 2014., Completed for: Ontario Biodiversity Council; Supervising Professor: Paul Elliot; Trent Community Research Centre, No course - paid research internship

Pages

Search Our Digital Collections

Query

Enabled Filters

  • (-) ≠ Services for

Filter Results

Date

1984 - 2024
(decades)
Specify date range: Show
Format: 2024/02/29

Subject (Temporal)