Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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The importance of local youth involvement
Title page -- Abstract -- Acknowledgements -- Table of Contents -- List of Figures and Tables -- Chpater 1: Introduction -- Chapter 2: Literature Review. Introduction. Geography of Poverty. Geography of Crime. United Way -- Chapter 3: Research area and methodology. Questionnaire design. Data analysis. Ethical concerns -- Chapter 4: Results and discussion. Descriptive statistics of youth respondent sample. Youth opinions and attitudes. Geographical location: Volunteering and participation patterns. Geographical location: Issues and concerns. Discussion of youth volunteering and participation patterns. Discussion of youth issues and concerns -- Chapter 5: Conclusions. Summary of key findings. Research limitations. Considerations and reflection -- References -- Appendices. Appendix 1: Youth consideration survey: Intermediate and Senior. Appendix 2: List of themes. Appendix 3: Frequency table: Total responses per question., by Alice Bickle and Amardeep Takher. --, Includes bibliographic references (p. 61)., GEOG 470.
GIS based analysis of streamflow indications in the Grand River Basin
The purpose of this project was to explore the relationships between a Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) created ratio indicator and the population density of the Grand River watershed to examine [sic] the influence of population density and streamflow variability., Abstract -- Purpose -- Introduction -- Rationale. Variables rationale. Response variables -- Methods. Basin area. Main channel length. Stream density. Regulated flow. Population density. Average of the response variables -- Results -- Discussion -- Conclusion and recommendations -- References -- Bibliography -- Appendix I -- Appendix II -- Appendix III., A research report by Catherine Bickram ; [for] ; Bruce Pond at Ministry of Natural Resources. --, Date of project submission: April 2002., Includes bibliographic references (p. 15)., GEOG 440: Research in Physical Geography.
Women, citizenship and state restructuring
Diane Billingsley. --, WS400, Prof. McGraw, April 14, 1997, Peterborough Social Planning Council., Includes bibliographic references., WS 400: Advanced Studies in Feminism and Social Justice.
Education and Outreach at Local Organic Farm - Project 1
By Janelle Blanchard, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Trent Vegetable Gardens; Supervising Professor: Stephen Bocking; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: Matthew Hayes, ERST 4840H - Community Based Research
Education and Outreach at Local Organic Farm - Project 1 [poster]
By Janelle Blanchard, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Trent Vegetable Gardens; Supervising Professor: Stephen Bocking; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: Matthew Hayes, ERST 4840H - Community Based Research
Art gallery education guide
The purpose of this research project was to interview a Canadian woman artist, and create an education guide for the teachers of grade 5 students coming into the Art Gallery. The appendix is a transcript of the interview with the artist., by Thalia Bock. --, Completed for: Deirdre Chisholm at the Peterborough Arts Umbrella; Supervisor: Caroline Langill, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-based Education., Date of project submission: April 2008., Includes bibliographic references., WMST 383H, Women's Studies, Community-based research project.
How Much Can We Grow? Determining a Best Method to Measure Sidewalk/Frontyard/Backyard Garden Harvests
By Jennifer Boesche, Completed for: Nourish; Supervising Professor: Stephanie Rutherford; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -, Food insecurity is becoming a growing issue within the city of Peterborough. Food insecurity can be generally defined as having a lack of physical and economic access to an adequate quantity of both affordable and nutritious food. Nourish is a non-profit organization in Peterborough which seeks to improve food security within the Peterborough community by determining a single method which can be used to measure local homegrown garden harvests, in a project known as “How Much Can We Grow”. Information that can be collected from the chosen method is significant as it can help determine to what extent homegrown gardens are contributing to improving food security within the area, and encourage more individuals to become involved with gardening in the future. The following report will discuss the research results for the project and will cover the social benefits of gardening, motivations for gardening, and a single method that can be applied to the Peterborough area for measuring garden harvests. These results are based primarily on local survey responses, for a survey which was distributed throughout the Peterborough community.
How Much Can We Grow? Determining a Best Method to Measure Sidewalk/Frontyard/Backyard Garden Harvests [poster]
By Jennifer Boesche, Completed for: Nourish; Supervising Professor: Stephanie Rutherford; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -
Spaces of racism II
Section one: Introduction -- Section two: Methodology -- Section three: Analysis -- Racism -- Sexism and gender discrimination as compared to racism -- Comparison to last year's results -- Section four: Conclusion -- Section five: Recommendations -- Appendices., by Linzy Bonham and Andres Salazar., WMST 483H
Supporting Activism in Peterborough: Building Relationships to Support OPIRG Working Groups [poster]
By Ashley Bonner and Nomaan Butt, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Community Research Centre and OPIRG Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Paul Shaffer; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220Y - Assessment of Development Projects
Supporting Activism in Peterborough: Building Relationships to Support OPIRG Working Groups
This paper evaluates the effectiveness of OPIRG Peterborough in supporting its working groups. The conceptual framework is built on a literature review drawing on relevant themes, policy review of PIRGS across Ontario and interviews from working group participants to identify working group dynamics and best practices. Results suggest that communication, training, networking, planning and reflection are areas in which OPIRG both demonstrated strengths and weakness. Recommendations for OPIRG staff and working group members are included. This study extends previous discussion on effective campaigning and relationships between OPIRG and working groups by implementing planning mechanisms within the working groups and offering networking opportunities on a local, provincial and PIRG to PIRG basis., By Ashley Bonner and Nomaan Butt, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Community Research Centre and OPIRG Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Paul Shaffer; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220Y - Assessment of Development Projects
How Does the Peterborough Community Understand its Immigrant Population?
By Sabina Borger, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: New Canadians Centre; Supervising Professor: Chris Beyers; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: Matthew Hayes, IDST 3700Y - Community Based Research

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