Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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Report to Peterborough County and City Councils
The purpose of this project was to help Peterborough Social Planning Council with a survey in regards to housing insecurity in Peterborough City and County. The student was to recode responses to open-ended questions and enter them into a data-base [sic]., Summary of recommendations -- Introduction -- Situation in Peterborough County and City -- Coordination of planning -- Emergency response -- Affordability: Income -- Housing supply -- Coordination of housing and related services -- Legislative and policy recommendations -- Acknowledgments -- Homelessness coordinating committee -- Appendices., Homelessness and Housing Insecurity Task Force. --
Research methods for a spatially dispersed membership
Introduction -- Methodology -- Literature review -- Part 1: Data collection method -- Part 2: Sampling considerations -- Recommendations -- Conclusion -- Bibliography., by Jason Wigmore., GEOG 470 - Research in Human Geography
Research of county trails
by Diana Kouril., Completed for: County of Peterborough. Supervising Prof. Stephen Bocking, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Date of Project Submission: April, 2010., Includes bibliographical references., ERST 3840: Community-Based Research Project.
Research of tourist sites
by Erin Jones and Jennifer Dijkema., Date of Project Submission: April, 2009., Completed for: County of Peterborough, Tourism Promotion; Supervising Professor: Mark Skinner and Heather Nicol, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliography and maps., GEO 470, Research in Human Geography.
Research on Community Gardens
Municipal Community Garden Delivery Models and Proposed Guidelines for Site Selection and Development / Philip Gleeson, Neil Jones, Sean Yilmaz -- Managing a Successful Community Garden Operation / Hanah McFarlane and Evan Brockest -- Community Gardens : A review of local stakeholders and their relationships / By Jessica Goodfellow & Liam Quan., By Evan Brockest, Phillip Gleeson, Jessica Goodfellow, Neil Jones, Hannah McFarlane, Liam Quan, and Sean Yilmez., Completed for: Kawartha Heritage Conservancy; Supervising Professor: Paula Anderson, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliographic references., ERST 3340H - The Canadian Foo System: A Community Development Approach.
Research report on
This two-part final report is a review of theoretical literature on Violence Against Women and the Aftermath of Violence. Part One of the report will identify the definitions, nature and extent of violence against women in Canada, focusing on a broad-based analysis of the problem, and recognition of its multidimensional nature., 1. Gender-based violence: an introduction -- 2. Measuring gender-based violence: methodological tools -- 3. Spousal abuse: violence against women in intimate partnerships -- 4. Sexual violence -- 5. Theoretical perspectives on violence against women -- 6. Legal response to violence against women -- 7. Conclusion -- 8. Resisting violence: coping/survival strategies -- 9. The consequences and impacts of violence -- 10. Community-based responses to domestic violence -- 11. Community-based responses to sexual violence -- 12. Community-based responses: education and general interventions -- 13. Bibliography., by Nancy Courtney ; for Peterborough Social Planning Council. --, Date of project submission: April 2002., Includes bibliographic references (p. 79)., WS/CS 481: Gender, Violence and Community Initiatives in Canada.
Research report on Kawartha Credit Union
Summary -- Introduction -- Background -- Methodology -- Results -- Limitations -- Analysis -- Conclusion -- Appendix., Written by: Zafar Khan, Euna (Jung-Youn) Lyu, Richard Sun, Elizabeth Vanderburg, Kenny Zhong., Completed for: Kawartha Credit Union; Supervising Professor: Prof. Kim Bates, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., ADMN 482: Community-Based Research Project.
Residents' Experiences with the City of Peterborough's Rent Supplment Programs
By Brianne Walton, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: City of Peterborough, Housing Division; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Community-Based Research Project
Residents' Experiences with the City of Peterborough's Rent Supplment Programs
By Brianne Walton, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: City of Peterborough, Housing Division; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Community-Based Research Project, The following paper investigates Peterborough residents’ experiences with current geared-to-income rent supplement programs offered by Peterborough Housing Corporation. The purpose of this research was to capture the participants’ personal experiences and determine whether geared- to-income rent supplements have a positive effect on people’s lives financially as well as their overall well-being. To obtain this goal, all the tenants receiving geared-to-income rent supplements from Peterborough Housing Corporation were mailed a survey. The survey consisted of quantitative and qualitative questions concerning the allocation of financial resources while receiving rent supplements. Participants were asked whether their quality of life has improved since receiving rent supplements. Additional data was collected from participants to determine how participants heard about the program, how long they were waitlisted, whether they are currently on a waitlist for other forms of affordable housing, and any personal comments they had about the program. The research showed participants’ quality of life has improved compared to life before receiving rent supplements. Most respondents said that while receiving rent supplements they could afford things that they could not before such as better quality food, transportation, and child care. In addition, most respondents reported an increased sense of community while receiving supplements since they can socialize more within and outside their homes. However, future research should be conducted with the landlords participating in these programs, as well as a comparison to flat-rate rent supplements they City of Peterborough offers.
Residents' Experiences with the City of Peterborough's Rent Supplment Programs [presentation slides]
By Brianne Walton, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: City of Peterborough, Housing Division; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Community-Based Research Project
Review of occupational and environmental health studies in Peterborough, Ontario
While the City of Peterborough, Ontario has been experiencing a period of growth and development, the industries that marked its past are continuing to have an impact on the health and well-being of both area residents and the environment in which they live., Sera Weafer-Schiarizza., Completed for: Occupational and Environmental Health Coalition; Supervising Professor: Carolyn Kapron, Trent University; Trent-Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliographic references., BIOL 389
Review of the Job Creation Opportunities of Greater Localization of Food Supply and Consumption
Food localization is an economically viable initiative that addresses some wider themes associated with international development, namely, the question of food insecurity and self- sufficiency faced by local economies; and that of sustainable growth models of development, predicated upon the provision of alternative, local sustainable options for economic security. The challenges created by food insecurity and dependence on imports is compounded by the volatility and unreliability of global oil prices, which in turn has an effect on food prices due to transportation and fossil-fuel inputs costs. Localization aims to eliminate these issues by creating independent and self-sufficient community-based economies with structurally adequate forward and backward linkage food supply chains. Localization not only embodies an environmentally conscious model of growth, but it also fosters economic benefits for the economy mainly achieved through the direct, indirect and induced employment impacts originating from the food industry. The purpose of this research is to provide insight into how the employment potential of localization could be assessed, through a viable impact assessment tool. The historic and contemporary trends in Peterborough’s food industry justify the economic imperatives for a localization shift. Transition Town Peterborough (TTP)’s 25% shift committee has been conducting research on the economic development opportunities that an increase of 25% in Peterborough’s local food supply and consumption over a decade would generate, with specific attention to employment generation. Research undertaken by TTP suggests that the 25% shift will create a net economic benefit of over $400 million per annum for the local economy (TTP 2014). The purpose of this report is to further enumerate on the economic viability of localization for Peterborough, and to address the alleged and potential economic opportunities arising from its implementation, with special emphasis on job creation. This project also discusses impact assessment methodological options to capture the employment effects of localization. The paper begins by an executive summary and introduction, which set the scene for the analysis of the primary research questions and methodology. This is followed by a section on the findings of the research, informed by the methodology and the research questions. The final component comprises a section on recommendations and a conclusion., By Mutsa Danzvara, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Transition Town Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Paul Schaffer; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: John Marris, IDST 4220Y - Assessment of Development Projects

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