Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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What Services Are Available for Youth in Peterborough and What Should Be? [poster]
By Ngina Kibathi, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Regional Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: John Marris, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
What Services Are Available for Youth in Peterborough and What Should Be?
By Ngina Kibathi, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Regional Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: John Marris, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
Westclox Company records
by Priscilla Lo., Date of Project Submission: April 2014., Completed for: Peterborough Museum and Archives ; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson ; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliography and appendices., FRSC 4890Y.
Welcome charter in the city of Peterborough
Introduction -- Definitions -- Literature review. Critical histories, contemporary realities. Critically oriented solutions. Meanings and practices. Settlement patterns. Localizing the research. Conclusion -- Research methodology. Research design. Research sample. Data collection, analysis and interpretation. Research protocol -- Case studies. London, ON. Toronto, ON -- Analysis. Toronto and London, ON. Peterborough, ON -- Recommendations. Guiding principles. Commitments to action. Next steps/future directions -- Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Appendix. Interview questions (London, ON). Interview questions (Toronto, ON). Informed consent., Researcher: Makeda Zook., Completed for: Community Race Relations Committee; Supervising Professor: Nadine Changfoot, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliographic references., POLI 491H.
Waste management from production to recycle
The document "measuring progress towards sustainability - Waste Indicators" main theme is to define waste indicators in Peterborough, Ontario. These will be used to determine what indicators are available, what they tell us and what other information is needed to reduce waste., 1. Introduction -- 2. Waste management and indicators -- 3. Definitions -- 4. Waste indicators. 4.1 Industrial waste / household waste. 4.2 Composting. 4.3 Recycling. 4.4 Landfill. 4.5 Green consumption. 4.6 Source reduction -- 5. Analysis -- 6. Recommendations -- 7. Conclusion -- 8. Appendix., by: Ikuyo Kikusawa. --, Includes: research report, presentation., Completed for: Peterborough Sustainability Network; Professor ... Stephen Bocking, Trent University, Trent-Centre for Community-Based Education., Date of project completion: April 5, 2006., Includes bibliographic references., ERSC 483, WI2005, Environmental Studies.
WIN program evaluation
This evaluation has revealed that WIN has had a great deal of success and that it definitely warrants expansion to include as many elementary schools as possible. As the program expands, it may face more challenges that it did as a pilot project., Acknowledgements -- Executive summary -- Section I: Introduction. 1. Introductory comments. 2. Description of Kinark. 3. Description of WIN -- Section II: The evaluation. 1. Introduction. 2. Goals. 3. Objectives -- Section III: Methodology. 1. Introduction. 2. Background research. 3. Observations. 4. Interviews. 5. Focus group. 6. Written surveys. 7. Reliability of findings. 8. Lessons learned -- Section IV: Findings. 1. Introduction. 2. Staff. 3. Students. 4. Teachers. 5. Case study #1. 6. Case study #2. 7. Case study #3. 8. Case study #4 -- Section V: Recommendations. 1. Introduction. 2. Program. 3. Delivery. 4. Administration. 5. Priorities -- Section V: Concluding remarks -- List of tables. Table 1. Table 2. Table 3. Table 4 -- List of figures. Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3 -- List of appendices., By: Katherine Barron and Heather Walsh., Completed for: Kinark Child an Family Services; Supervising Professor Daniel Powell, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community Based Education., Includes bibliographic references., IDST 422.
Volunteer Program Development [poster]
By Danielle Claxton, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough Community Police Service; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
Volunteer Program Development
Victim Services seeks to maintain high quality services to crime victims by maintaining officer awareness of victims’ concerns while also liaising with other networks and resources in the community. Victim Services are responsible for implementing and maintaining a comprehensive program to address the broad needs of victims. The Victim Services team has long considered the potential positive impact that a volunteer program could have towards helping victims of crime in the City of Peterborough. I administered a survey responsible for addressing questions regarding the recruitment and training process, as well as the job description of volunteers. The survey was conducted with seven Victim Services units across Ontario that have volunteer programs. These areas include: Windsor, Guelph, Toronto, Durham, Hamilton, Ottawa and Waterloo. From the survey, it can be concluded that all volunteer programs with Victim Services Units operate in their own unique way depending on the needs of their corresponding geographical area. Using the information gathered from the survey, I developed recommendations pertaining to how a volunteer program should be implemented in Peterborough. The main recommendations are further outlined in the report and include: approximately six to eight volunteers, with a minimum age of 21. In addition, I recommended that volunteers must commit to a minimum of one year of volunteering with Victim Services while completing a minimum of four shifts a month. Lastly, I suggested that the training for the volunteers should be conducted with online modules and in-class sessions., By Danielle Claxton, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough Community Police Service; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
Volunteer Bureau assessment report
by Heather Stewart and Kasia Kalat ; for the Community Counselling and Resource Centre. --, Date of project submission: April 2002., CDST 422.
Visitor management
Introduction and background -- Methodology -- Introduction to Australian State Parks. Sustainable tourism. Interpretation-based management strategies. Stakeholders. Evaluating management effectiveness. Case study: Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Services. Summary of Australian Parks -- Alberta Provincial Parks. Visitor management for Alberta Provincial Parks. Legislation: Provincial Parks Act, 2000. Case study: Lesser Slave Lake Provincial Park, Dinosaur Provincial Park and Cypress Hill Provincial Park. Summary of case studies. Conclusion to Alberta Provincial Parks -- Visitor management for Parks Canada. Legislation: Canada National Parks Act, 2000. Case study: Wood Buffalo National Park. Case study: Auyuittuq National Park, Quittinirpaaq National Park, Sirmilik National Park and Kikkitanee National Park (Nunavut National Parks). Conclusion to Parks Canada -- Conclusion: Best practices and recommendations., Kimberly Wilson., Complete for Ontario Parks; Supervising Professor: Prof. Stephen Hill, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliographical references (p. 38-40)., ERST 384H.
Violence in the workplace
The first half of this paper concerns publications that focus on prevention of physical violence. The second half of this paper discusses methods to prevent other forms of workplace violence, mainly interpersonal conflict, verbal abuse, and colleague sabotage., Executive summary -- Introduction -- Review of workplace violence prevention techniques. Prevention of physical violence. Screening and selection. Policies and procedures. Environmental approaches. Behavioural and administrative approaches. The "ideal" WPV prevention policy. Zero tolerance policies. Risk assessments. Joint Union/management policies. Employee assistance programs. ASAP program. Staff support groups. Prevention of interpersonal conflict, verbal abuse, and sabotage. Toxic behaviour and sabotage. What is a healthy work environment? Characteristics of a positive work culture. Stress reduction and workplace violence. Organizational support and workplace violence -- Conclusions -- Suggestions for further work -- Bibliography., by Jennifer Nash. --, Includes final research report., Completed for: Lynn Zimmer, Y.W.C.A. ; Supervising Professor, Joan Ayre, T.C.C.B.E., Date of project completion: April 2005., Includes bibliographic references (p. 26)., NURS 302 - Community health nursing care.
Victimization of young women
Abstract -- Keywords and definitions -- Introduction -- Methods -- High risk youth -- Health issues -- Violence -- Social status -- Recommendations -- Acknowledgements -- References., by Alice Czitrom., Completed for: Peterborough Lakefield Community Police Service, The Victim Services Unit; Supervising Professor: Joanna Freeland, Trent University; Course Coordinator: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Completion Date: April 2010., Includes bibliographical references., FRSC 4980, Community-Based Education.

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