Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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The Nicholas Yunge-Bateman Sous-Fonds – A Description of the Collection in Accordance with the Rules for Archival Description [poster]
By Megan Schevers, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Valley Archives; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
The Social Impacts of the Katimavik Pilot Project 2014/15: Perspectives from the Métis Youth Participants
By Terri Asselstine, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Katimavik; Supervising Professor: Don McCaskill and Gillian Austin (GTA); Trent Community Research Centre, INDG 3813Y - Indigenous Studies Research
Promoting Community Belonging
Previous research has determined that having a sense of community belonging can help reduce youth’s criminal involvement. Given this, the HKPR Regional HSJCC initiated the current project to explore and identify youth programs that promote and/or create the conditions to enhance youth’s sense of belonging. The aim of this project was to determine what types of programs promote community belonging; identify how these programs were distributed within Haliburton, the City of Kawartha Lakes and Northumberland; and analyze how these programs were structured in terms of barriers and commonalities. Using a qualitative approach data was collected through a literature review, an environmental scan and interviews. Results revealed that multiple terms indicate community belonging, and that a diverse range of programs can help enhance this feeling. Programs identified in each of the research areas tended to be located within close proximity to one another, and were not evenly distributed. Comparisons of the programs also revealed that the most common barriers youth face to participation are financially and accessibility related. Future suggestions include: addressing these barriers, and working to better inform these communities of the impact that having a sense of community belonging can have for youth. Considering educationally based programing, program structures that view at- risk youth positively, and incorporating positive role models are recommended as future directions in developing an ideal youth program. Involving youth in continued research is also strongly suggested to enhance their sense of belonging while mitigating potential criminal involvement., By Brooke Janes, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Regional Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
Promoting Community Belonging [poster]
By Brooke Janes, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Regional Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
YES Shelter for Youth and Families: Communication Protocols Part 1 [poster]
By Melissa Di Matteo, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: YES Shelter for Youth and Families; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
Trauma: Understanding and Resolving its Presence in Peterborough [poster]
By Patrick Mueller, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trauma Informed Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
Supporting Activism in Peterborough: Building Relationships to Support OPIRG Working Groups
This paper evaluates the effectiveness of OPIRG Peterborough in supporting its working groups. The conceptual framework is built on a literature review drawing on relevant themes, policy review of PIRGS across Ontario and interviews from working group participants to identify working group dynamics and best practices. Results suggest that communication, training, networking, planning and reflection are areas in which OPIRG both demonstrated strengths and weakness. Recommendations for OPIRG staff and working group members are included. This study extends previous discussion on effective campaigning and relationships between OPIRG and working groups by implementing planning mechanisms within the working groups and offering networking opportunities on a local, provincial and PIRG to PIRG basis., By Ashley Bonner and Nomaan Butt, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Community Research Centre and OPIRG Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Paul Shaffer; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220Y - Assessment of Development Projects
Supporting Activism in Peterborough: Building Relationships to Support OPIRG Working Groups [poster]
By Ashley Bonner and Nomaan Butt, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Community Research Centre and OPIRG Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Paul Shaffer; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220Y - Assessment of Development Projects
The Social Impacts of the Katimavik Pilot Project 2014/15: Perspectives from the Métis Youth Participants [poster]
By Terri Asselstine, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Katimavik; Supervising Professor: Don McCaskill and Gillian Austin (GTA); Trent Community Research Centre, INDG 3813Y - Indigenous Studies Research
The Nicholas Yunge-Bateman Sous-Fonds – A Description of the Collection in Accordance with the Rules for Archival Description
By Megan Schevers, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Valley Archives; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
Environmental Scan of Workplace and Vocational English as a Second Language Programming
Peterborough Ontario is looking at ways to improve immigration integration within the community. This environmental scan explores current and innovative practices of workplace and vocational English as a Second Language (ESL) programming for small urban cities to determine if such a program could fill this need. The broader literature and prior studies maintain that there is a need to determine if language is the sole deterrent to hiring foreign-born employees in small urban centers or if there is a larger cross-cultural issue that must be addressed. The research presented here suggests that the most successful programs consider these cross-cultural matters and the importance of including stakeholders at multiple levels. Given the diversity of Peterborough’s immigrant population and the logistical vastness of the Peterborough area, it was determined that a program that was multileveled and delivered as a workplace ESL program to meet the varied needs of immigrants and their employers would be best suited to the area. Qualitative data collected through a literature review and key informant interviews with service providers generated deeper understanding and nuances of program challenges, and an online survey supported the collected data., By Amy Archer and Heli Vanaselja, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough Partnership Council of Immigration Integration; Supervising professor: Paul Shaffer; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220Y
How Did the Turtle Cross the Road: A Turtle Road Mortality and Mitigation Study [poster]
By Alison Flint, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project

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