Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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Alternative negotiation methods
This project explores methods of negotiation. It begins with a description of the pros and cons of traditional bargaining, stressing that the drive to win in such a process tends to lead to aggression. The author goes on to describe several alternative methods of negotiation, focusing on Interest-Based Bargaining, a method of negotiation that encourages open discussion and mutual co-operation based on the development of trust between the negotiation partners., Traditional bargaining -- Alternative based negotiations -- Positions and interests -- How all the units in a collective agreement come together -- Interested based negotiation -- Trust is key -- Four areas of development in IBB -- The first step: "Issues" -- The second step: "Interests" -- Debono's six hats -- The third step: "Brainstorming" -- The fourth stage: "Solution" -- The disadvantages of IBB -- Impressions -- My own opinion regarding IBB and traditional bargaining -- Bibliography., by Jennifer L. Brown. --, Includes: final research report; bibliography., Completed for: United Way and the Peterborough District Labour Council; Professor Ted Crabtree, Trent University; Trent-Centre for community-based education., Includes bibliographic references (p. 31)., ADMN 483H, Business Administration, Community-based research project.
An Evolving Fair Landscape: Incorporating Alternative Agriculture into the Norwood Fall Fair's Activities
By Reuben Peter Dirk Noteboom, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Norwood Agricultural Society; Supervising Professor: Dr. Tom Hutchinson; Trent Community Research Centre, SAFS 3860 - Community-Based Research Project
An analysis to determine if people living with an intellectual disability are effectively and equally treated in the legal system
The purpose of this research was to determine if there were any deficiencies in the legal system when interacting with individuals living with intellectual disabilities and if the Peterborough legal community would benefit from support from Community Living Peterborough. From the analysis, a list of recommendations was proposed to improve the interaction between these two systems., Abstract -- Key word and definitions -- Introduction -- Methods -- Analysis and discussion -- Recommendations -- Barriers -- Conclusion -- Appendices., Blain Cox, Laurel Hopkins. --, Includes bibliographic references., FRSC 4980 Y: Community-Based Education Research Project.
An evaluation of Come Cook With Us
Since 2006 the Peterborough City County Health Unit (PCCHU) has been operating a variety of cooking classes to teach new culinary skills and knowledge, and provide meals for citizens. The main purpose of these programs has been to play a small role in a larger scheme, to tackle issues of food insecurity and social exclusion within the area., 1. Executive summary -- 2. Introduction to the Come Cook With Us program -- 3. Defining and understanding the terminology. 3.1 Food security: Origins and implications. 3.2 Social poverty: Exclusion and inclusion -- 4. Methodological considerations. 4.1 Survey. 4.2 Interviews. 4.3 Participant observations -- 5. Findings and analysis. 5.1 Survey results. 5.2 Interview results. 5.3 Participant observation results. 5.4 Synthesis of results -- 6. Recommendations -- 7. Conclusions -- 8. References -- 9. Appendices., Ryan Kohls and Andrew Wells., Completed for: Peterborough County/City Health Unit; Supervising Professor: Chris Beyers, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliographic references (p. 33)., IDST 422 - Assessment of Development Projects.
An evaluation of Ontario's Mandatory Charge Policy
The following is an evaluation of Ontario's Mandatory Charge Policy (OMCP) in Peterborough. It was conducted from November 2009 to April 2010, as a research project by two fourth year students from the International Development Studies class IDST 422: Assessment of Development Projects at Trent University for the Peterborough Lakefield Community Police Service (PLCPS), and facilitated by the Trent Centre for Community-Based Education (TCCBE)., Executive summary -- Table of contents -- Background information concerning the policy. Origin of the policy. Goals of the policy. Who's involved in the policy? -- Description of the evaluation study. Purpose of the evaluation. Evaluation design -- Findings. Police interviews. Victim interviews. Community service agency interviews. Observational findings. Quantitative analysis -- Discussion of findings. Effectiveness of OMCP. Unintended consequences. Community services and victims involved in OMCP -- Costs and benefits. Costs. Benefits -- Conclusions and recommendations & options. Conclusions. Recommendations & options regarding OMCP. Recommendations for future research -- References -- Appendices. Appendix A: Semi-structured interview schedules. Appendix B: Quantitative variables and possible data values., by Rachael Edge and Andrew Skinner., Completion Date: April 2010., Completed for: Peterborough Lakefield Community Police Service, The Victim Services Unit; Supervising Professor: Chris Beyers, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliography., IDST 422, Assessment of Development Projects.
An evaluation of Peterborough Green-Up for use in its strategic planning
This report is the result of an evaluation conducted as a practical learning experience facilitated by the Trent Centre for Community Based Education (TCCBE). The TCCBE invites local organizations and businesses with research projects to work with university students such as ourselves. The purpose of the report is to provide information and recommendations to help guide Green-Up as it builds a new strategic plan., Acknowledgements -- Abstract -- Introduction -- Organization profile -- Methodology -- Findings and analysis -- Evaluation of evaluation -- List of appendices., By Bernice Asiedu-Ampem and Natalie Napier. --, Includes bibliographic references., International Development Studies 422: Assessment of development projects.
An evaluation of a youth literacy program
The Stay in School High School Program (SISHS Program) is a recent pilot project of the Learning Disabilities Association of Peterborough. It is designed to offer youth that are struggling in high school with academic and/or social issues an alternative learning environment with personal one-to-one tutoring and support to achieve the student's academic goals., Executive summary. Recommendations -- Introduction -- Background -- Methodology. Methodological approach. Participant observation. Interviews. Limitations -- Findings-discussion-recommendations. Introduction. Section 1: Attendance. Strengths of attendance. Challenges with attendance. Incentives as a suggestion to help with attendance. Relationships as a form of retention. Discussion. Re-cap -- Section 2: Tutor/participant relationships. One-to-one tutoring. Multiple tutors for one student. Learning disabilities. Goals. Discussion. Re-cap -- Section 3: Training. Discussion. Re-cap -- A need in the community -- Section 4: Structural. Suggestions for more days and hours a week. Time commitment. Money. Room size. Organization and communication. Discussion. Re-cap -- Conclusion -- Strengths and challenges -- Recommendations -- References -- Appendix., by Amber Schuler and Bethany Robinson (nee Martin)., Completion Date: April 2010., Completed for: The Learning Disabilities Association of Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Chris Beyers, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliography and appendices., IDST 422, Assessment of Development Projects.
An evalutation of the peer support role in Bright Future Programs
Executive summary -- Introduction. 1.1 Research. 1.2 Ethics. 1.3 Interview process -- Organizational background. 2.1 Origins of the Peterborough Family Resource Centre. 2.2 History of Brighter Futures program. 2.3 Goals of the Peterborough Family Resource Centre. 2.4 Brighter Future programs administered by Peterborough Family Resource Centre. 2.5 Current peer support role. 2.6 Research questions to be answered -- Methodology design. 3.1 The purpose of this project. 3.2 Qualitative analysis. 3.3 Interviews. 3.4 Costs and barriers to the approach. 3.5 Reliability and validity -- Findings and analysis. 4.1 Coordinators. 4.2 Peer support mothers. 4.3 Participants. 5.1 Recommendations. 6.1 Best practices checklist -- Works cited -- Appendices., By: Mira Bulshtein and Kudzai Ushe., Completed for: Peterborough Family Resource Centre; Supervising Professor: Chris Beyers, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., IDST 422.
An exploration on immigrant entrepreneurship in Peterborough
1: Introduction -- 2: Literature review. 2.1: Community Economic Development (CED). 2.2: Government programs. 2.3: Non-profit organizations. 2.4: Social capital. 2.5: Ethic enclave theory. 2.6: Language and cultural climate. 2.7: Neoliberal context -- 3: Method. 3.1: Business resources in Peterborough. 3.2: Creation of entrepreneurship services guide. 3.3: Creation of the survey. 3.4: Survey process -- 4: Researcher reflections. 4.1: Inconsistencies when creating the entrepreneurship services guide. 4.2: Research characteristics. 4.3: Disconnects and discourse -- 5: Conclusions. 5.1: Business resource awareness, use and rated experience. 5.2: Survey results in comparison with academic literature -- 6: Discussion of conclusions -- Bibliography., Mary Dirmeitis. --, Includes bibliographic references., CAST 4770Y: Studies in Canadian Social Policy.
An investigation into the treatment of child sexual assault/abuse in the Peterborough area
Each year thousands of children are victimized by crimes of sexual assault/abuse and significantly affected by the consequences that stem from suffering this form of trauma. Not only [sic] is important for these children to receive treatment, but it is imperative that the treatment received is effective., Abstract -- Key words -- Introduction -- Methods -- Results -- Discussion. Best forms of treatment. Comparison of private sector to organizations in Peterborough area. Comparison of Peterborough to other locations. Identification of gaps. Difficulties experienced -- Recommendations -- Conclusion -- References -- Appendix A: Table 1 -- Appendix B: Table 2 -- Appendix C: Empirical studies references -- Appendix D: Boost treatment assessment outline., Christine Barnett. --, Includes bibliographic references., FRSC 4890: Community-Based Education Research Project.
An outline of Invasive plant disposal pathways across Ontario's municipalities
By Carolyn Holmes, Kristin Phasey, Josie Wilman & Carly Spitzer, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Ontario Invasive Plant Council; Supervising Professor: Tom Whillans; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: John Marris, ERSC 3160H - Community Based Resource Management

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