Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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Identification of Best Practices for Coach in Special Needs Hockey
By Karlene Lloyd, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Kawartha Komets Special Needs Hockey Program; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 -, The purpose of the project was to get concrete research into developing best practices for coaching special needs hockey. A review of the literature was conducted to see the importance of getting individuals with a disability involved in sports and the positive impact it can have on an individual’s life. Surveys were sent out to organizations in both Canada and the United States. Following the surveys, five individuals were interviewed; who possessed a wealth of knowledge in special needs hockey. The results showed significant differences in many aspects of the special needs hockey community and how the practice of coaching is approached. However some core characteristics of successful coaching included the importance of a fun and safe environment, getting to know each player as an individual, and having a positive outlook about the playing experience were agreed upon amongst organizations.
Determining Barriers to Enrollment in the Ontario Electricity Support Program in Peterborough City and Country [poster]
By Victoria Hamilton & Laila Tarakai, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: The Energy Cost Work Group, Peterborough Ontario; Supervising Professor: Dr. Michal Avram; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220 - Assessment of Development Projects
Evaluation of the Sex Work Action Project in Peterborough, Ontario from 2013-2014 [presentation]
By Ryne Evans and Brittany Reid, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: PARN; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Forensic Community-Based Research Project
History of a Student-Led Organization II
By Mason Godden, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: ORPIG; Supervising Professor: Dimitry Anastakis; Trent Community Research Centre, HIST4020 - Honours Thesis, Abstract: OPIRG Peterborough celebrates its 40th anniversary of social and environmental justice activism in the Peterborough community. As a continuation of Rihannon Johnson’s History of a Student-Led Organization I, this project chronicles the development of OPIRG Peterborough during the 1990’s. Using sociologist Alan Sears’ ‘infrastructure of dissent’ paradigm, each chapter explores a different social and environmental campaign that OPIRG Peterborough was involved with during the 1990’s. In doing so, the historical evolution of the organization is traced. At the theoretical level, however, the infrastructure of dissent (and its implications for social mobilization) is re-evaluated in every chapter, culminating in a conclusion that posits that the infrastructure of dissent may be more applicable to the study of social movements than Sears originally conceptualized. By contextualizing OPIRG Peterborough as part of a wider student movement in Chapter One, it is seen that the infrastructure of dissent has a professional ‘branch,’ one that is necessary for the survival of grassroots organizations. By analysing the historical development of the Peterborough Ecology Garden in Chapter Two, it is argued that the infrastructure of dissent has the capacity to homogenize the organizational identities of environmental justice organizations that may otherwise appear fractured. In Chapter Three, the capacity for the infrastructure of dissent to foster individual identities within OPIRG Peterborough working groups is discussed. By developing these particular facets of the infrastructure of dissent, it is argued that the infrastructure itself may be key to formulating effective social mobilizations outside of strictly labour-political dichotomies.
Transitional Housing to Prevent and Reduce Youth Homelessness
By Melissa Hunt, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Youth Emergency Shelter; Supervising Professor: May Chazan; Trent Community Research Centre, WMST4820 - Community-Based Research Project
Telling the Story of T.C.R.C. Research
By Sabina Thiessen, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Community Research Centre; Supervising Professor: Michal Avram; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220 - Community-Based Research Project, The topic of this project is the discipline of university-based community-based research, more specifically within the context of the Trent Community Research Centre. Its purpose is to review the archive of TCRC projects to find those of notable quality that may be highlighted at the TCRC’s 25th anniversary conference, and to uncover what trends have developed within TCRC projects over the years. Interviews were conducted with host organizations, Trent faculty, and former TCRC staff. Ongoing archival research in addition to the interviews emphasized specific trends, including sociopolitical, environmental, economic and cultural. Analysis of these trends helps to situate the TCRC within the broader field of community-based research.
Telling the Story of T.C.R.C. Research [poster]
By Sabina Thiessen, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Community Research Centre; Supervising Professor: Michal Avram; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220 - Community-Based Research Project
Approaching a $15 Minimum Wage at Trent University [poster]
By Rachel Flinders, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: OPIRG; Supervising Professor: Heather Nicol; Trent Community Research Centre, GEOG4030 - Community Based Research in Geography
Do Trent University Students Support the Divestment From Fossil Fuels Movement? A Methodology Development
By Alaine Spiwak & Kristina Dergacheva, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Climate Justice Trent; Supervising Professor: Dr. Michal Avram; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220 - Assessment of Development Projects, This paper explores the divestment from fossil fuels movement, which is a recent socioenvironmental movement aimed at pressuring Canadian universities and colleges to dissolve current investments, stocks, or bonds in the fossil fuel industry. This divestment campaign took place at Trent University from 2012-2015, but was unsuccessful in their lobbying for full fossil fuel divestment. As this is a recent movement at Trent, this paper aims to collect data on how to best survey the level of knowledge and support Trent students have for the divestment campaign. The specific research questions investigated are: What is the best method of collecting data to determine if Trent students support divestment from fossil fuels? What is the best method to engage students with the divestment from fossil fuels movement? The methods used to answer these research questions involved implementing and testing four different types of data collection: online surveys, focus groups, semi-structured interviews, and opportunity sampling. After analyzing all of the data collected, a methodology was developed which will be used by Part II of this project to survey the widest student population possible, and to break into previously untapped student demographics.
Residents' Experiences with the City of Peterborough's Rent Supplment Programs
By Brianne Walton, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: City of Peterborough, Housing Division; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Community-Based Research Project
Supportive Housing: A key Ingridient in the Safety and Well-being of Thriving Communities [poster]
By Christopher M. Stephen, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough Police Service; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Forensic Community-Based Research Project
Supporting Immigrant Entrepreneurs
By Brieanna Elliot, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: New Canadians Centre ; Supervising Professor: Heather Nicol; Trent Community Research Centre, GEOG4030 - Community Based Research, In partnership with the New Canadians Centre, located in Peterborough, the goal of this research is to find ways to assist immigrants with entrepreneurship which will in turn lead to growth of the economy of the City of Peterborough as a whole. As Canadians, we live in a highly multicultural society in which immigration is the norm. Many of the immigrants that immigrate to Canada choose Peterborough to call their new home. The New Canadians Centre works closely with immigrants in Peterborough to help their transition to the city go as smoothly as possible, while also drawing attention to programs and opportunities in Peterborough that will help with economic, health, along with social needs. Immigrants have established businesses in many cities within Canada, thereby contributing to Canada’s economy, society and culture. The City of Peterborough currently has the highest percentage of immigrant entrepreneurs in Canada; it is therefore especially important to focus on implementing programs in order to better assist new and potential immigrant entrepreneurs in Peterborough to help them to realize their full potential in the community. This research will focus specifically on immigrant entrepreneurship in the City of Peterborough, while drawing from identified best practices of programs and supports available for immigrant entrepreneurs in other communities.

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