Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

Pages

History of the Nichols Oval Stage
By Cameron Smith and Carolyn Conrad, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough Folk Festival; Supervising Professor: Chris Dummitt; Trent Community Research Centre, HIST3010 - Community-Based Research Project
History of the Nichols Oval Stage [poster]
By Cameron Smith and Carolyn Conrad, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough Folk Festival; Supervising Professor: Chris Dummitt ; Trent Community Research Centre, HIST3010 - Community-Based Research Project
History of the computer and the Jacquard loom
The story of silk -- The silk industry in France -- The drawloom -- Jacquard and his loom -- Charles Babbage -- Ada Lovelace -- Herman Hollerith -- The birth of IBM -- Dawn of the computer age: Howard Aitken -- The evolution of computing -- Jacquard's legacy., Louise Eggleton. --, Includes bibliographic references., HIST 3900Y: Reading Course.
History within these walls
The purpose of this research was to provide a complete history of Sadleir House. Sadleir House is located at 751 George Street North in the City of Peterborough, Ontario. In addition to researching the present and former owners, the geographical impacts these individuals or groups had on the Peterborough community were also examined., Abstract -- Acknowledgements -- List of figures and tables -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- Chapter 2: Literature review. 2.1 Historical geography. 2.2 Archival research. 2.3 Oral history. 2.4 Heritage. 2.5 Heritage building preservation -- Chapter 3: Methodology. 3.1 Study area. 3.2 Archival research. 3.3 Oral histories. 3.4 Ethics -- Chapter 4: Results. 4.1 Kendry Family (1892-1902). 4.2 Stratton Family (1902-1917). 4.3 Sheehy Family (1917-1963). 4.4 Trent University (1963-2002). 4.5 Peter Robinson Community and Student Association (2004-Present) -- Chapter 5: Discussion. 5.1 James Kendry. 5.2 James Stratton. 5.3 Richard Sheehy. 5.4 Trent University. 5.5 Peter Robinson Community and Student Association -- Chapter 6: Research conclusions. 6.1 Summary of findings. 6.2 Research setbacks. 6.3 Future research -- References., Tyson Richardson and Ryan Convery., Date of Project Submission: April, 2009., Completed for: Dwayne Collins at Sadleir House; Supervisor(s): Heather Nicol & Mark Skinner, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community Based Education., Includes bibliography., GEOG 470: Research in Human Geography.
Horticultural pathways
Invasive plants are plant species that are not native to Canada and United States. These plants are a problem because they out compete and displace native plants that wildlife depend on. This report outlines some goals for prevention and management of invasive species., 1.0 Introduction. 1.1 Strategic goals in Canada. 1.2 Strategic goals in US -- 2.0 Role of Federal Government of Canada. 2.1 Agriculture Canada. 2.2 Canadian Boarder Services. 2.3 Canadian Food Inspection Agency. 2.4 Environment Canada. 2.5 Natural Resources Canada. 2.6 Parks Canada -- 3.0 Provincial. 3.1 Alberta. 3.2 British Columbia. 3.3 Manitoba. 3.4 New Brunswick. 3.5 Newfoundland & Labrador. 3.6 Nova Scotia. 3.7 Ontario. 3.8 Prince Edward Island. 3.9 Quebec. 4.0 Saskatchewan -- 4.0 US Federal. 4.1 Department of Agriculture. 4.2 Importing and exporting. 4.3 US Great Lake States -- References., by Keith Reid, Jason Noronha & Natasha Hilts. --, Completed for: Francine Macdonald at the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters; Supervisor: Paula Anderson, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-based education., Date of project submission: April 2008., Includes references (p. 18)., ERST 316, Environmental Resource Studies, Community-Based Natural Resource Management
Household product public education
This report reviews common household products and shows their contained ingredients, possible side effects after usage and suggestions for 'green' alternatives., By: Michael Reid. --, [Completed for]: Peterborough Green-up ; Supervising Professor: Ann MacLeod, [Trent University] ; Trent Centre for Community-based education., Date of project submission: April 2008., Includes references., NURS 402, Nursing, Independent nursing practice.
Household products public education II
The purpose of this report is to continue needed research on the human and environmental affects of common household products. Peterborough Green-Up will use the information to continue the Green Shopping Guide, a database of suggestions for local consumers to use when shopping for environmentally sustainable or healthier choices., Acknowledgements -- Abstract -- List of tables -- List of figures -- List of maps -- 1.0 Chapter one: Introduction -- 2.0 Chapter two: Theories, models, and hypothesis -- 3.0 Chapter three: Review of literature -- 4.0 Chapter four: Study area -- 5.0 Chapter five: Methodology -- 6.0 Chapter six: Data and results -- 7.0 Chapter seven: Discussion -- 8.0 Chapter eight: Recommendations -- Chapter nine: Summary and conclusions -- References -- Appendices., By: Ashley Hook-Rohland. --, Includes: appendices and bibliography., Completed for: Cate Henderson & Paula Anderson at Peterborough Green-up ; Supervisor: Alan Brunger, Trent University ; Trent Centre for Community-based Education., Date of project submission: April 2008., Includes bibliographic references (p. 36-38)., GEOG 470, Geography, Community-based research project.
How Did the Turtle Cross the Road: A Turtle Road Mortality and Mitigation Study
The purpose of the present research was to identify areas of high turtle road mortality, known as hotspots, in order to determine what steps can be taken to help reduce the number of endangered turtle species killed on Ontario roadways. The project was completed by collecting data on turtle locations and using ArcGIS mapping software, by Esri, to determine hotspot locations along a specific highway in Ontario. Once hotspots were determined, examination of literature was conducted to determine the best way to prevent road mortality. Finally, individuals from government and non-for-profit organizations focused on turtle road mortality were interviewed to help determine what is a realistic plan to combat turtle road mortality. In the area of focus, 4 hotspot locations were observed, and the most effective mitigation measures were determined to be a combination of a culvert and a drift fence. In terms of implementation, the jurisdiction over a roadway and whether mitigation measures will be put into place belongs to the proper road authority. However, when road construction impacts an endangered species, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry can enforce, under the Ontario Endangered Species Act, the road authority to implement mitigation measures. Throughout this project, areas for future research such as improving communication between groups involved in turtle road mortality, were also identified and noted., By Alison Flint, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
How Did the Turtle Cross the Road: A Turtle Road Mortality and Mitigation Study [poster]
By Alison Flint, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
How Does the Peterborough Community Understand its Immigrant Population?
By Sabina Borger, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: New Canadians Centre; Supervising Professor: Chris Beyers; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: Matthew Hayes, IDST 3700Y - Community Based Research
How Does the Peterborough Community Understand its Immigrant Population? [poster]
By Sabina Borger, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: New Canadians Centre; Supervising Professor: Chris Beyers; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: Matthew Hayes, IDST 3700Y - Community Based Research
How Much Can We Grow? Determining a Best Method to Measure Sidewalk/Frontyard/Backyard Garden Harvests
By Jennifer Boesche, Completed for: Nourish; Supervising Professor: Stephanie Rutherford; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -, Food insecurity is becoming a growing issue within the city of Peterborough. Food insecurity can be generally defined as having a lack of physical and economic access to an adequate quantity of both affordable and nutritious food. Nourish is a non-profit organization in Peterborough which seeks to improve food security within the Peterborough community by determining a single method which can be used to measure local homegrown garden harvests, in a project known as “How Much Can We Grow”. Information that can be collected from the chosen method is significant as it can help determine to what extent homegrown gardens are contributing to improving food security within the area, and encourage more individuals to become involved with gardening in the future. The following report will discuss the research results for the project and will cover the social benefits of gardening, motivations for gardening, and a single method that can be applied to the Peterborough area for measuring garden harvests. These results are based primarily on local survey responses, for a survey which was distributed throughout the Peterborough community.

Pages

Search Our Digital Collections

Query

Enabled Filters

  • (-) ≠ Services for

Filter Results

Date

1984 - 2024
(decades)
Specify date range: Show
Format: 2024/04/24

Subject (Temporal)