Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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Economic Impact of a Social Enterprise [poster]
By: Renzo Costa and Bhekumusa Khumalo, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Seasoned Spoon Café; Supervising Professor: Dr. Paul Shaffer; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220Y - Assessment of Development Projects
Evaluation of Immigration Integration Programs in Peterborough: Speakers Bureau and ESL Forum
By Alexandra Izgerean and Lai Ming Chui, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough Partnership Council on Immigrant Integration; Supervising Professor: Paul Shaffer, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community Based Education, IDST 4220Y - Assessment of Development Projects
The Nicholas Yunge-Bateman Sous-Fonds – A Description of the Collection in Accordance with the Rules for Archival Description [poster]
By Megan Schevers, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Valley Archives; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
Volunteer Program Development
Victim Services seeks to maintain high quality services to crime victims by maintaining officer awareness of victims’ concerns while also liaising with other networks and resources in the community. Victim Services are responsible for implementing and maintaining a comprehensive program to address the broad needs of victims. The Victim Services team has long considered the potential positive impact that a volunteer program could have towards helping victims of crime in the City of Peterborough. I administered a survey responsible for addressing questions regarding the recruitment and training process, as well as the job description of volunteers. The survey was conducted with seven Victim Services units across Ontario that have volunteer programs. These areas include: Windsor, Guelph, Toronto, Durham, Hamilton, Ottawa and Waterloo. From the survey, it can be concluded that all volunteer programs with Victim Services Units operate in their own unique way depending on the needs of their corresponding geographical area. Using the information gathered from the survey, I developed recommendations pertaining to how a volunteer program should be implemented in Peterborough. The main recommendations are further outlined in the report and include: approximately six to eight volunteers, with a minimum age of 21. In addition, I recommended that volunteers must commit to a minimum of one year of volunteering with Victim Services while completing a minimum of four shifts a month. Lastly, I suggested that the training for the volunteers should be conducted with online modules and in-class sessions., By Danielle Claxton, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough Community Police Service; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
Building Bridges to Protect Seniors from Financial Abuse [poster]
By Leah Cino, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Community Counselling and Resource Centre (CCRC); Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: John Marris, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
Approaching a $15 Minimum Wage at Trent University
By Rachel Flinders, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: OPIRG; Supervising Professor: Heather Nicol; Trent Community Research Centre, GEOG4030 - Community Based Research in Geography, The goal of this report is to research post-secondary campuses and cities that have implemented a $15 minimum wage, as well as campaigns and concrete strategies for doing so. Guided by this research, it will propose the best approach to implementing a $15 minimum wage at Trent University and in Peterborough. The methodological approach used to address the research questions raised in this particular study will be to acquire and analyze data through the completion of a comprehensive literary review of previously available and related knowledge, as obtained from primarily academic, government and university website documents. Successful movements toward a $15 minimum wage as experienced in the City and County of San Francisco, the City and State of New York, and the province of Alberta are analyzed. Successful movements toward a $15 minimum wage the in post-secondary institutions of the University of Washington, the University of California, and York University are also analyzed. From this research, the most important aspects of a successful $15 minimum wage movement are identified, and a general model to approaching a $15 minimum wage has been created. It is recommended that moving forward in campaigning for and/or implementing a $15 minimum wage in Trent and Peterborough, that this general model be considered as a guide. It is also recommended that further research be completed on the effects of a $15 minimum wage on the Trent University and Peterborough Economy, prior to implementation
Determining Barriers to Enrollment in the Ontario Electricity Support Program in Peterborough City and Country
By Victoria Hamilton & Laila Tarakai, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: The Energy Cost Work Group, Peterborough Ontario; Supervising Professor: Dr. Michal Avram; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220 - Assessment of Development Projects, The rising costs of hydro places a financial burden on low-income households. The Ontario Electricity Support Program (OESP) was launched to help relieve the pressure of these rising costs in Ontario. However, within the City and County of Peterborough there has been low enrollment in the subsidy program, representing a missed opportunity for individuals struggling with energy poverty. The objective of this research project was to identify the barriers that low-income households face when enrolling into the OESP, in order to provide recommendations to improve uptake. Previous literature pertaining to the review of low enrollment in various government subsidies suggests that individuals face barriers, due to the application process, lack of promotion, and the multiple steps required to receive the benefit. Our results indicate that individuals within the City and County of Peterborough experience similar barriers, which have caused the low enrollment into the OESP, and includes recommendations to address the barriers that low-income Ontario households are facing.
The Durham At-Risk Housing Network Evaluation
By Skylar Onistchenko-Abrantes, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Community Development Council Durham; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Forensic Community-Based Research Project, The purpose of this project was to evaluate a housing network within the Durham Region (Durham At-Risk Housing Network) by comparing it to other similar networks, identifying the impact the network has had on its members, their clients, and any improvements that could be made to better suit its members. A literature review was conducted to determine the existence of similar housing networks, while surveys were administered to the members to determine the network’s success and possible improvements. It was determined, that the network is successful from the perspective of its members, as 95% of the networks members use the information presented to them during the meetings at least once per month and 91% agreed that they were a member because it improved their work. It was demonstrated that 55% and 25% of participants either agreed or strongly agreed that their clients had benefitted from their participation in the network. The Durham At-Risk housing network has been extremely beneficial to its members in providing information about resources available to the homeless, thereby positively impacting the member’s clients. Members would find it beneficial to determine topics of discussion, broadening the scope of the Durham At-Risk Housing Network (DARNH) to all aspects of homelessness, increasing the frequency of the meetings, increasing the number of organizations in the network, and creating an online forum to increase the amount of inter-organization communication to facilitate change.
Admission Records Analysis For Size and Prior Injury, and Development of Streamlined Admissions Tool
By Nicole Simon, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre ; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Community Based Research, The research conducted for the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre was completed with the purpose of understanding the dangers that the turtle population of Ontario faces. Spatial analysis was conducted on the 2016 intake records for the OTCC. This analysis was completed using ArcGIS 10.1 which allowed the construction of a number of maps to be completed. A literature review was conducted outlining the different methodologies used to assign turtles to age categories. Within the literature review other wildlife Centres were contacted to obtain information on how they perform age categorization. These methods were compared to the OTCC and it was discovered that the best method would be to track turtles from hatchling, but this is not always possible. Analysis of the intake records were then completed with the goal of determining size by species and prior injury data. The size by species analysis yielded numerous graphs depicting the average size by species as well as age, and sex. Unfortunately, there was not enough data available to make usable inferences on prior injury data. This information would be crucial for maintaining mitigation or even implementing it. A task of the project included developing a digital intake tool to allow for more consistent record keeping. The completion of the digital intake tool now includes a separate section for prior injury to allow for prior injury analysis to be conducted.
Peterborough Natural Areas: The net gains and losses in natural heritage features from 1996-2016 [poster]
By Vanessa Potvin, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough Field Naturalists; Supervising Professor: Heather Nicol; Trent Community Research Centre, - Community-Based Research Project
Evaluation of the 2013-2014 Sex Work Action Project (SWAP) in Peterborough, Ontario
By Ryne Evans and Brittany Reid, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: PARN; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Forensic Community-Based Research Project, The purpose of the present project was to evaluate the Sex Work Action Project (SWAP) that ran in Peterborough, Ontario from 2013-2014. The goal of SWAP was to improve the quality of life of street-level sex workers in Peterborough. This project aimed to determine the impact and value of SWAP, and to evaluate the strengths of the program and the improvements that could be made for a future program. Through reviews of relevant literature and similar programs in Canada, it was determined what is required and what makes a sex work support program sustainable and effective. Through in-depth interviews with front-line workers involved in SWAP, the strengths and the challenges of the program were discovered. It was confirmed that a program of this type would be a necessity in Peterborough, but there are notable areas of improvement that are needed for a future program to be successful, including better planning, organization of resources and funding. Combining this knowledge, the evaluation was summarized into a number of recommendations to improve a future sex work support program in Peterborough.
Sustainable Stormwater Management: Protecting Peterborough's Harper creek Through Effective Policy and Priority Placement of Rain Gardens
By Emily Amon, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough GreenUp; Supervising Professor: Tom Whillans, Stephen Hill; Trent Community Research Centre, ERSC4830 - Community-Based Research Project

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