Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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Peterborough Community Support Court: An Evaluation of Recidivism
By Nhu Nguyen, Completed for: Peterborough Local HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Julia Bakker; Trent Community Research Centre, PSYC 4901H / CAST 4813H -
Promising Practices for Landlord Engagement and Retention in Mitigating Tenancy Risk in the Mental Health and Addications Sector [presentation]
By Craig Rutherford, Completed for: HKPR Regional HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
Promising Practices for Landlord Engagement and Retention in Mitigating Tenancy Risk in the Mental Health and Addications Sector [poster]
By Craig Rutherford, Completed for: HKPR Regional HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
Promising Practices for Landlord Engagement and Retention in Mitigating Tenancy Risk in the Mental Health and Addications Sector
By Craig Rutherford, Completed for: HKPR Regional HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -, This report has two main purposes. The first is to identify which social service providers are involved in finding rental accommodation for clients and determining the challenges which are faced by these organizations as a consequence of landlord’s concerns about renting to marginalized individuals. The second is to identify the approaches social service providers use to mitigate these landlord concerns to create best practice recommendations for the Haliburton- Kawartha Lakes-Pine Ridge (HKPR) region. Research was completed using an extensive and thorough literature review, email fact-finding and an online survey. Findings from this research included the identification of organizations within the HKPR region that work in housing and with individuals who are marginalized. The mitigation methods these organizations use such as rent supplements, arranging for repairs, and paying for damaged property to mitigate different landlord concerns were also identified. The main concerns landlords have are non-payment of rent, damaged property, and neighborhood. Innovative programs such as RentSmart Ontario and the critical role these programs play is highlighted in addition to new adaptations on the previously established Housing First ideology with the Tiny Homes program.
Effective Options for Post-Custody Accommodation [poster]
By Carissa McPhee, Completed for: Regional Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
Effective Options for Post-Custody Accommodation
By Carissa McPhee, Completed for: Regional Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -, This paper examines provincial post-custody accommodation. The purpose of this research, was to investigate what is currently occurring in the Haliburton Kawartha Pine Ridge (HKPR) region and review any existing best practice or programs for post-custody accommodation. To achieve this goal, a grey literature review was conducted and a survey addressing post-custody accommodation was emailed to social service organizations in the HKPR region. The survey consisted of qualitative and quantitative questions. The organizations were asked if they provided any services or support for post-custody clients, if they directly operated housing for post-custody, what problems post-custody clients experience, any barriers and challenges to meeting accommodation needs, any services that should be implemented and if the federal mandated post-release planning should be implemented provincially. The research demonstrated that the biggest barrier was a lack of housing. In terms of services, housing support workers and long term permanent housing should be implemented. The research also alluded to organizations wanting to see similar post-release planning, as mandated at the federal level. Recommendations include: targeting organizations that directly operate post-custody accommodation, disperse yearly surveys, test other post-custody accommodation models and fight for adequate housing.
The Experiences of Residents with the City of Peterborough's Rent Supplement Programs Part 2 [presentation]
By Sabrina Bailey, Completed for: City of Peterborough Housing Division; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
The Experiences of Residents with the City of Peterborough's Rent Supplement Programs Part 2 [poster]
By Sabrina Bailey, Completed for: City of Peterborough Housing Division; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
The Experiences of Residents with the City of Peterborough's Rent Supplement Programs Part 2
By Sabrina Bailey, Completed for: City of Peterborough Housing Division; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -, The purpose of this research was to determine what feedback the City of Peterborough should gather from recipients of its supplement programs, what survey structure can be implemented on an annual basis, what impact on quality of life financial support has had on tenants, and how the rent supplement has affected the recipients’ living arrangements. The City of Peterborough rent supplement program provides rent subsidies to individuals of low income to reduce the amount that they have to allocate to rent. To accomplish the goals of this study, recipients of rent supplements participated in a survey and focus group. The survey consisted of quantitative and qualitative questions inquiring about the participants’ experiences since receiving the supplement. The focus group expanded on the results from the survey. Grey literature research was conducted to determine what information other municipalities have gathered on residents’ experiences with their rent supplement programs. The data shows that overall the quality of life and living arrangements have improved for individuals receiving a rent supplement. Residents can now afford healthier groceries and social activities. In order to conduct the survey on an annual basis the questions should be quantitative and responses collected on a scale of strongly agree to strongly disagree. This paper is a continuation of a project that is interested in the experiences of residents receiving supplements from the City of Peterborough. Part one of this research focused on geared-to-income programs. This part focuses on flat-rate rent supplements offered by the Housing Resource Centre.
Barriers Preventing Youth from Using Transportation in Peterborough [poster]
By Jacob Slater, Completed for: Peterborough Youth Commission; Supervising Professor: Cheryl McKenna-Newman & Roger Picton; Trent Community Research Centre
Barriers Preventing Youth from Using Transportation in Peterborough
By Jacob Slater, Completed for: Peterborough Youth Commission; Supervising Professor: Cheryl McKenna-Newman & Roger Picton; Trent Community Research Centre, Barriers Preventing Youth From Using Transportation in Peterborough was a community based research project that was completed in the 2017-2018 academic year at Trent University,Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. The purpose of the project was to expand on information previously obtained by the Peterborough Youth Council (the host organization of the project), being that the youth demographic of Peterborough experience issues when accessing the local pubic transit system. Specifically, this project illustrated the expansion of this information and through research it was identified that the perception of transit accessibility vary significantly across socioeconomic cohorts. Through performing a literature reviews and conducting interviews, several attributes were identified as having influence over transit accessibility including: frequency, overall route and network coverage, as well as user’s proximity to transit stops. However it was noted that through research that different perspectives exists in regards to which attribute is considered the most important or most significant. Ultimately, these different perspectives present the suggestion that citizens from different life-stages and social statuses hold distinctive attitudes regarding transit accessibility. As result, several research tools were created with the intention of being used in further studies conducted by the Peterborough Youth Council that would be used to investigate the specific factors that lead to youth in Peterborough having issues and feelings of anxiety when accessing public transit. Furthermore, several strategies that could improve transit accessibility, by targeting specific attributes that were deemed as having significant influence over transit accessibility were suggested.
Inter-comparison of Precipitation Gauges for Water Survey Monitoring [poster]
By Scotia Brailsford and Meghan Forget, Completed for: Ministry of Natural Resources; Supervising Professor: Tom Whillans; Trent Community Research Centre

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