Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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Literature review
Intro -- Marketing a Health Care Library -- Information Seeking Behavior of Women -- Assessing the Strengths versus Weaknesses of the Internet -- Evaluating the Effectiveness of Library Services and Marketing Plan -- Conclusion -- Bibliography., By: Natalie Wasserlauf, Date of project submission: March, 2003., Completed for: Women's Health Centre; Supervising Professor: Joan Ayre and Molly Westland, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Bibliography missing., NURS 302.
Monitoring protocols examining shoreline naturalization and measures of water quality
by Catherine Warren., Includes bibliographic references., ERST 383 and ERST 316.
Residents' Experiences with the City of Peterborough's Rent Supplment Programs [presentation slides]
By Brianne Walton, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: City of Peterborough, Housing Division; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Community-Based Research Project
Residents' Experiences with the City of Peterborough's Rent Supplment Programs
By Brianne Walton, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: City of Peterborough, Housing Division; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Community-Based Research Project, The following paper investigates Peterborough residents’ experiences with current geared-to-income rent supplement programs offered by Peterborough Housing Corporation. The purpose of this research was to capture the participants’ personal experiences and determine whether geared- to-income rent supplements have a positive effect on people’s lives financially as well as their overall well-being. To obtain this goal, all the tenants receiving geared-to-income rent supplements from Peterborough Housing Corporation were mailed a survey. The survey consisted of quantitative and qualitative questions concerning the allocation of financial resources while receiving rent supplements. Participants were asked whether their quality of life has improved since receiving rent supplements. Additional data was collected from participants to determine how participants heard about the program, how long they were waitlisted, whether they are currently on a waitlist for other forms of affordable housing, and any personal comments they had about the program. The research showed participants’ quality of life has improved compared to life before receiving rent supplements. Most respondents said that while receiving rent supplements they could afford things that they could not before such as better quality food, transportation, and child care. In addition, most respondents reported an increased sense of community while receiving supplements since they can socialize more within and outside their homes. However, future research should be conducted with the landlords participating in these programs, as well as a comparison to flat-rate rent supplements they City of Peterborough offers.
Residents' Experiences with the City of Peterborough's Rent Supplment Programs
By Brianne Walton, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: City of Peterborough, Housing Division; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Community-Based Research Project
Accessibility in Downtown Peterborough Businesses [poster]
By Kathleen Walkter & Shannon Shillinglaw, Completed for: Big IDeA; Supervising Professor: Mark Skinner; Trent Community Research Centre, GEOG 4030 -
Accessibility in Downtown Peterborough Businesses
By Kathleen Walkter & Shannon Shillinglaw, Completed for: Big IDeA; Supervising Professor: Mark Skinner; Trent Community Research Centre, GEOG 4030 -, This summary is a synthesis of our project and the main outcomes we have discovered through our research. The attitudes and decisions of Downtown Peterborough Business Owners in relation to disability accessibility and inclusion were explored. We conducted our study on the stores that were accessible from the sidewalk on George and Charlotte Street. Our research design consisted of a literature review of accessibility legislation and scholarly sources to help inform and analyze our research. We conducted a stakeholder consultation with the Council for Peoples with Disabilities to hear their perspectives and experiences with Downtown Peterborough businesses. Thirty-six surveys from a variety of Downtown Peterborough businesses were collected and interviews with four business owners were conducted. Through our research design we were able to determine many findings about accessibility in Downtown Peterborough.
The History and Experience of Community-Based Research in Forensic Science [poster]
By Jennifer Wale, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Community Research Centre; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Community-Based Research Project
The History and Experience of Community-Based Research in Forensic Science
By Jennifer Wale, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Community Research Centre; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Community-Based Research Project, The purpose of this project was to highlight the unique collaboration of Forensic Science and Community-Based Research at Trent University facilitated by the Trent Community Research Centre (TCRC). A review of literature was conducted, and interviews of hosts, TCRC staff, faculty members and students were conducted as a means of gaining personal perspectives on the history and experience of the program. The course began in the academic year of 2009-2010 and that the idea of a collaboration between these two fields came from a friendly conversation between a TCRC staff member and the Trent faculty supervisor. In addition, most of the projects conducted address research themes of a social nature due to the criminal foundation of Forensic Science. In general host organizations were positively impacted by the projects conducted, using results to implement new best practice ideas and make positive change in the local community. Finally the Forensics student gained a unique learning experience that had a positive affected on their choices after completing their undergraduate degrees. The findings of this study could be used to create a best practices guide for Community-Based Research in Forensics Science, or to create the foundation for expansion of this program.
The History and Experience of Community-Based Research in Forensic Science [presentation]
By Jennifer Wale, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Community Research Centre; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Community-Based Research Project
Invasion of the round goby (negobius melanostomus) in Great Lake tributaries
Invasive species are a continuing issue for Ontario, in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. The round goby is an example of this. This study focuses on the distribution of round gobies within Great Lake tributaries and the impact of barriers., Abstract -- Introduction -- Methods -- Results -- Discussion -- Conclusion -- References -- Appendix A -- Appendix B., by Bethany Waite. --, Includes: final research report; bibliography; appendices., Completed for: Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters; Supervising Professor: Michael Fox, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-based education., Date of project submission: April 2008., Includes bibliographic references., ERSC 384H, Environmental Resource Science, Community-based research project.
introduction and background research analysis
Car sharing is a new and exciting way to travel that cuts costs and reduces gas emissions that pollute our environment. Car sharing is a popular mode of transportation in Europe, which is where the idea originated., 1) Executive summary -- 2) Section 1: What are the macro trends in personal vehicle ownership that effect the long-term viability of car co-cops? -- 3) Section 2: What is happening with vehicle co-ops in other jurisdictions? -- 4) Section 3: What has been the experience of Canadian vehicle co-ops to date in terms of market acceptance and financial performance? -- 5) Section 4: What might we identify as best practice in terms of the management and organization of vehicle co-ops? -- 6) Conclusion -- 7) References -- 8) Appendix section., Presented By: Kim Vu., Date of project completion: January 31, 2000., Presented to: Professor Ahlstrand and Community Opportunity & Innovation Network., Includes bibliographic references (p. 37)., ADMIN 482.

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