Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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Understanding the Increase in Mental Health Calls to Peterborough Police Since 2010
By Scottie Jean Curran, Completed for: Peterborough Police Service; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -, In 2010 there was a spike in the calls that the Peterborough Police Service (PPS) received and classified as mental health related. There has not been a significant decline in mental health calls since this rise in 2010. To understand why there was an increase in calls, this project investigated how the PPS currently classify the calls they receive and changes that may have occurred in the system for classification around 2010. Fact-finding meetings were set up by the host agency (PPS) to answer these internal questions. Online literature reviews were done and fact finding meetings with mental health service providers were requested via email. This was to determine whether mental health issues increased in 2010, whether other services knew of changes in the Peterborough community around 2010, whether similar increases in demand were experienced by the Peterborough mental health services, and whether there was a change, reduction or disappearance of services provided prior to 2010.
Understanding the Increase in Mental Health Calls to Peterborough Police Since 2010 [poster]
By Scottie Jean Curran, Completed for: Peterborough Police Service; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
Understanding the Increase in Mental Health Calls to Peterborough Police Since 2010 [presentation]
By Scottie Jean Curran, Completed for: Peterborough Police Service; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
History of a community orgranization II
by Caitlin Currie., Date of Project Submission: May 2012., Completed for: Centre for Gender and Social justice; Supervising Professor: Nadine Changfoot, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliography and zine., POST 4070Y.
The Status of the Artist in Peterborough [poster]
By Anna Currier, Completed for: Electric City Culture Council; Supervising Professor: Colleen O'Manique; Trent Community Research Centre
The Status of the Artist in Peterborough
By Anna Currier, Completed for: Electric City Culture Council; Supervising Professor: Colleen O'Manique; Trent Community Research Centre
Victimization of young women
Abstract -- Keywords and definitions -- Introduction -- Methods -- High risk youth -- Health issues -- Violence -- Social status -- Recommendations -- Acknowledgements -- References., by Alice Czitrom., Completed for: Peterborough Lakefield Community Police Service, The Victim Services Unit; Supervising Professor: Joanna Freeland, Trent University; Course Coordinator: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Completion Date: April 2010., Includes bibliographical references., FRSC 4980, Community-Based Education.
Impact of climate change on the deepwater fish Shortjaw Cisco
by Aaron Dale and Stevie Yhap., Date of Project Submission: April 2013., Completed for: Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources; Supervising Professor: Heather Nicol and Peter Lafleur; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliography and appendices., GEOG 4030Y.
Evaluation tools for transition housing program
Homelessness is a serious problem in North America today. In 1990, women comprised between 15% and 29% of the homeless population and are steadily increasing because of multiple economic, historic and political factors., 1. Abstract -- 2. Keywords -- 3. Introduction -- 4. Methods -- 5. Analysis -- 6. Discussion -- 7. Recommendations -- 8. Conclusion -- 9. Acknowledgments -- 10. References -- 11. Appendix A -- 12. Appendix B -- 13. Appendix C., By Allison Dale. --, Includes bibliographic references., FRSC 4980Y: Community-Based Education Research Project.
The Lakefield Millennium Trail
This trail study of the Lakefield Millennium Trail aims to determine if the trail is being used and how it is being used on Saturday and Sunday from June to September the first., Summary -- Introduction -- Methodology. Part one: User observation. Part two: Interviews -- Credibility of results. Part one: User observation. Part two: Interviews -- Results. Part one: User observation. Part tow: Interviews -- Analysis of results. Part one: User observation. Part two: Interviews -- Further analysis and recommendations -- Conclusion -- Appendix. One: User observation tallying locations. Two: User observation recording sheet. Three: Interview locations. Four: Questionnaire. Five: Results from interviews -- Bibliography., Chantal Dalgliesh. --, Completed for: Lakefield Millennium Trail Stewardship; Supervising Professor: Stephen Bocking, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliographic references., ERST 383H.
Review of the Job Creation Opportunities of Greater Localization of Food Supply and Consumption
Food localization is an economically viable initiative that addresses some wider themes associated with international development, namely, the question of food insecurity and self- sufficiency faced by local economies; and that of sustainable growth models of development, predicated upon the provision of alternative, local sustainable options for economic security. The challenges created by food insecurity and dependence on imports is compounded by the volatility and unreliability of global oil prices, which in turn has an effect on food prices due to transportation and fossil-fuel inputs costs. Localization aims to eliminate these issues by creating independent and self-sufficient community-based economies with structurally adequate forward and backward linkage food supply chains. Localization not only embodies an environmentally conscious model of growth, but it also fosters economic benefits for the economy mainly achieved through the direct, indirect and induced employment impacts originating from the food industry. The purpose of this research is to provide insight into how the employment potential of localization could be assessed, through a viable impact assessment tool. The historic and contemporary trends in Peterborough’s food industry justify the economic imperatives for a localization shift. Transition Town Peterborough (TTP)’s 25% shift committee has been conducting research on the economic development opportunities that an increase of 25% in Peterborough’s local food supply and consumption over a decade would generate, with specific attention to employment generation. Research undertaken by TTP suggests that the 25% shift will create a net economic benefit of over $400 million per annum for the local economy (TTP 2014). The purpose of this report is to further enumerate on the economic viability of localization for Peterborough, and to address the alleged and potential economic opportunities arising from its implementation, with special emphasis on job creation. This project also discusses impact assessment methodological options to capture the employment effects of localization. The paper begins by an executive summary and introduction, which set the scene for the analysis of the primary research questions and methodology. This is followed by a section on the findings of the research, informed by the methodology and the research questions. The final component comprises a section on recommendations and a conclusion., By Mutsa Danzvara, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Transition Town Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Paul Schaffer; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: John Marris, IDST 4220Y - Assessment of Development Projects

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