Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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Adaptive Planning for Emerald Ash Borer Invasion
By Kaitlyn Fike, Alex Fisher, and Adam Fyfe, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Nature Areas Stewardship Advisory Committee; Supervising Professor: Tom Whillans; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: John Marris, ERSC 4830Y - Community-Based Research Project
Comparing Models for Addiction Services
A comparative analysis of harm reduction and abstinence addiction treatment programs focusing on Peterborough City and County, Kawartha Lakes, Haliburton County, and Northumberland County has not been done. The present study researched previous studies in the field of addiction services, identifying the available services in the specified regions, surveying those services, and compiling data to determine the gaps in the current services to make future recommendations. This work is critical to addiction service research because substance use is a significant area of concern in the research area and across Canada. The study will aid in the identification and implementation of services needed in the four counties to reduce addiction and indirectly keep addiction-related offenders away from the criminal justice system. A literature review of harm reduction and abstinence was conducted using on-line portals. A questionnaire containing service details, client statistics, and gaps in services was administered to the available service providers and front line services including youth services and hospitals. Results show that individuals face many barriers when dealing with their addictions which include stigma, transportation, financial issues, and wait times for service. The current distribution of services is mostly harm reduction- compared to abstinence-based services but both serve equal males and females. The most prominent substance use is with alcohol, cannabis, and opioids. The significant gaps that currently exist are a lack of communication between services, a lack of funding for additional services, and a lack of residential detoxification centres and addiction supportive housing units., By Olivia Emino, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Human Service and Justice Coordinating Committee; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre (trentcentre.ca), FRSC 4890 - Community-Based Research in Forensic Science
How Did the Turtle Cross the Road: A Turtle Road Mortality and Mitigation Study [poster]
By Alison Flint, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Kawartha Turtle Trauma Centre; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
Education and Outreach at Local Organic Farm - Project 1
By Janelle Blanchard, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Trent Vegetable Gardens; Supervising Professor: Stephen Bocking; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: Matthew Hayes, ERST 4840H - Community Based Research
Review of the Job Creation Opportunities of Greater Localization of Food Supply and Consumption
Food localization is an economically viable initiative that addresses some wider themes associated with international development, namely, the question of food insecurity and self- sufficiency faced by local economies; and that of sustainable growth models of development, predicated upon the provision of alternative, local sustainable options for economic security. The challenges created by food insecurity and dependence on imports is compounded by the volatility and unreliability of global oil prices, which in turn has an effect on food prices due to transportation and fossil-fuel inputs costs. Localization aims to eliminate these issues by creating independent and self-sufficient community-based economies with structurally adequate forward and backward linkage food supply chains. Localization not only embodies an environmentally conscious model of growth, but it also fosters economic benefits for the economy mainly achieved through the direct, indirect and induced employment impacts originating from the food industry. The purpose of this research is to provide insight into how the employment potential of localization could be assessed, through a viable impact assessment tool. The historic and contemporary trends in Peterborough’s food industry justify the economic imperatives for a localization shift. Transition Town Peterborough (TTP)’s 25% shift committee has been conducting research on the economic development opportunities that an increase of 25% in Peterborough’s local food supply and consumption over a decade would generate, with specific attention to employment generation. Research undertaken by TTP suggests that the 25% shift will create a net economic benefit of over $400 million per annum for the local economy (TTP 2014). The purpose of this report is to further enumerate on the economic viability of localization for Peterborough, and to address the alleged and potential economic opportunities arising from its implementation, with special emphasis on job creation. This project also discusses impact assessment methodological options to capture the employment effects of localization. The paper begins by an executive summary and introduction, which set the scene for the analysis of the primary research questions and methodology. This is followed by a section on the findings of the research, informed by the methodology and the research questions. The final component comprises a section on recommendations and a conclusion., By Mutsa Danzvara, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Transition Town Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Paul Schaffer; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: John Marris, IDST 4220Y - Assessment of Development Projects
Kawartha World Issues Centre speakers bureau project
The KWIC Speakers Bureau is a database of local speakers who have volunteered to share their personal knowledge and experiences with the community - as public speakers, discussion leaders, lecturers, and in many other capacities. This year KWIC's focus is on environmental issues, and the expertise that members of the Peterborough community possess in this area is reflected in the wide variety of issues and subject matters that can be found in the Speakers Bureau. This project includes a User's Manual of how to use the database, an article for KWIC's fall newsletter describing the project and it's benefits to the community, as well as a personal reflection, which focuses on the development and implementation of the project., Abstract -- Article -- Reflection -- User's manual., by Candice MacAulay. --, Includes: final research report; reflection paper; user manual., Completed for: Shelia Nabigon-Howlett at KWIC; Supervising Professor: Susan Wurtele, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., WMST 482, Women's Studies, Community-based research project.
Equity and diversity gala
by Kathleen Benbow. --, Includes bibliographic references., WMST 383H: Community Research Placement.
Effective Options for Post-Custody Accommodation
By Carissa McPhee, Completed for: Regional Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -, This paper examines provincial post-custody accommodation. The purpose of this research, was to investigate what is currently occurring in the Haliburton Kawartha Pine Ridge (HKPR) region and review any existing best practice or programs for post-custody accommodation. To achieve this goal, a grey literature review was conducted and a survey addressing post-custody accommodation was emailed to social service organizations in the HKPR region. The survey consisted of qualitative and quantitative questions. The organizations were asked if they provided any services or support for post-custody clients, if they directly operated housing for post-custody, what problems post-custody clients experience, any barriers and challenges to meeting accommodation needs, any services that should be implemented and if the federal mandated post-release planning should be implemented provincially. The research demonstrated that the biggest barrier was a lack of housing. In terms of services, housing support workers and long term permanent housing should be implemented. The research also alluded to organizations wanting to see similar post-release planning, as mandated at the federal level. Recommendations include: targeting organizations that directly operate post-custody accommodation, disperse yearly surveys, test other post-custody accommodation models and fight for adequate housing.
Environmental Scan of Workplace and Vocational English as a Second Language Programming
Peterborough Ontario is looking at ways to improve immigration integration within the community. This environmental scan explores current and innovative practices of workplace and vocational English as a Second Language (ESL) programming for small urban cities to determine if such a program could fill this need. The broader literature and prior studies maintain that there is a need to determine if language is the sole deterrent to hiring foreign-born employees in small urban centers or if there is a larger cross-cultural issue that must be addressed. The research presented here suggests that the most successful programs consider these cross-cultural matters and the importance of including stakeholders at multiple levels. Given the diversity of Peterborough’s immigrant population and the logistical vastness of the Peterborough area, it was determined that a program that was multileveled and delivered as a workplace ESL program to meet the varied needs of immigrants and their employers would be best suited to the area. Qualitative data collected through a literature review and key informant interviews with service providers generated deeper understanding and nuances of program challenges, and an online survey supported the collected data., By Amy Archer and Heli Vanaselja, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough Partnership Council of Immigration Integration; Supervising professor: Paul Shaffer; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220Y
Environmental Scan of Workplace and Vocational English as a Second Language Programming [poster]
By Amy Archer and Heli Vanaselja, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Peterborough Partnership Council of Immigration Integration; Supervising professor: Paul Shaffer; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220Y
The Social Impacts of the Katimavik Pilot Project 2014/15: Perspectives from the Host Organizations
By Roxanne Kaczynski and Kameel Sharma, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Katimavik; Supervising Professor: Don McCaskill; Trent Community Research Centre, INDG 3813Y
The Social Impacts of the Katimavik Pilot Project 2014/15: Perspectives from the Host Organizations [poster]
By Roxanne Kaczynski and Kameel Sharma, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Katimavik; Supervising Professor: Don McCaskill; Trent Community Research Centre, INDG 3813Y

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