Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Composite Frankenstein
This thesis explores Frankenstein’s popular culture narrative, contrasting recent Frankenstein texts with the content of Mary Shelley’s classic novel and James Whale’s iconic films Frankenstein (1931) and The Bride of Frankenstein (1935). The research investigates how Frankenstein’s legacy of adaptations function intertextually to influence both the production and the consumption of Frankenstein texts, referring to this complicated and contradictory intertextual web as “the Composite Frankenstein.” This thesis present the Composite Frankenstein as a hermeneutic by which to view Frankenstein’s collaborative and cumulative identity in popular culture, drawing on the work of other scholars on adaptation and intertextuality. Sarah Milner investigates the context of the key Frankenstein texts, the novel and the 1931 film; this research’s goal is to destabilize the perception of authorship as an individual’s mode of production and to investigate the various social processes that influence text creation and consumption. Author Keywords: adaptation, authorship, Frankenstein, intertextuality, James Whale, Mary Shelley

Search Our Digital Collections

Query

Enabled Filters

  • (-) ≠ Morrison
  • (-) ≠ Brunetti
  • (-) = English literature
  • (-) ≠ Pendleton-Jiménez
  • (-) ≠ Eddy
  • (-) ≠ Wincherauk
  • (-) = Milner, Sarah

Filter Results

Date

2011 - 2021
(decades)
Specify date range: Show
Format: 2021/12/06

Name (Any)

Degree

Degree Discipline

Subject (Topic)