Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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Lake Ontario Shoreline Recession
By Jayson Ruth and Brittney Bishop, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Ganaraska Region Conservation Authority; Supervising Professor: Peter Lafleur; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: John Marris, GEOG 4030Y - Community-based Research in Geography
Understanding the integration of business and biodiversity
By: K. Potter, A. Zohar, T. McIntosh, Date of Project Submission: December 2014., Completed for: Ontario Biodiversity Council; Supervising Professor: Asaf Zohar; Trent Community Research Centre, No course - paid research internship
Effective Options for Post-Custody Accommodation [poster]
By Carissa McPhee, Completed for: Regional Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
The Experiences of Residents with the City of Peterborough's Rent Supplement Programs Part 2 [presentation]
By Sabrina Bailey, Completed for: City of Peterborough Housing Division; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
Promising Practices for Landlord Engagement and Retention in Mitigating Tenancy Risk in the Mental Health and Addications Sector [poster]
By Craig Rutherford, Completed for: HKPR Regional HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC 4890Y -
Peterborough Community Support Court: An Evaluation of Recidivism
By Nhu Nguyen, Completed for: Peterborough Local HSJCC; Supervising Professor: Julia Bakker; Trent Community Research Centre, PSYC 4901H / CAST 4813H -
How Much Can We Grow? Determining a Best Method to Measure Sidewalk/Frontyard/Backyard Garden Harvests
By Jennifer Boesche, Completed for: Nourish; Supervising Professor: Stephanie Rutherford; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -, Food insecurity is becoming a growing issue within the city of Peterborough. Food insecurity can be generally defined as having a lack of physical and economic access to an adequate quantity of both affordable and nutritious food. Nourish is a non-profit organization in Peterborough which seeks to improve food security within the Peterborough community by determining a single method which can be used to measure local homegrown garden harvests, in a project known as “How Much Can We Grow”. Information that can be collected from the chosen method is significant as it can help determine to what extent homegrown gardens are contributing to improving food security within the area, and encourage more individuals to become involved with gardening in the future. The following report will discuss the research results for the project and will cover the social benefits of gardening, motivations for gardening, and a single method that can be applied to the Peterborough area for measuring garden harvests. These results are based primarily on local survey responses, for a survey which was distributed throughout the Peterborough community.
Identification of Best Practices for Coach in Special Needs Hockey
By Karlene Lloyd, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Kawartha Komets Special Needs Hockey Program; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 -, The purpose of the project was to get concrete research into developing best practices for coaching special needs hockey. A review of the literature was conducted to see the importance of getting individuals with a disability involved in sports and the positive impact it can have on an individual’s life. Surveys were sent out to organizations in both Canada and the United States. Following the surveys, five individuals were interviewed; who possessed a wealth of knowledge in special needs hockey. The results showed significant differences in many aspects of the special needs hockey community and how the practice of coaching is approached. However some core characteristics of successful coaching included the importance of a fun and safe environment, getting to know each player as an individual, and having a positive outlook about the playing experience were agreed upon amongst organizations.
Determining Barriers to Enrollment in the Ontario Electricity Support Program in Peterborough City and Country [poster]
By Victoria Hamilton & Laila Tarakai, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: The Energy Cost Work Group, Peterborough Ontario; Supervising Professor: Dr. Michal Avram; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220 - Assessment of Development Projects
Evaluation of the Sex Work Action Project in Peterborough, Ontario from 2013-2014 [presentation]
By Ryne Evans and Brittany Reid, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: PARN; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre, FRSC4890 - Forensic Community-Based Research Project
History of a Student-Led Organization II
By Mason Godden, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: ORPIG; Supervising Professor: Dimitry Anastakis; Trent Community Research Centre, HIST4020 - Honours Thesis, Abstract: OPIRG Peterborough celebrates its 40th anniversary of social and environmental justice activism in the Peterborough community. As a continuation of Rihannon Johnson’s History of a Student-Led Organization I, this project chronicles the development of OPIRG Peterborough during the 1990’s. Using sociologist Alan Sears’ ‘infrastructure of dissent’ paradigm, each chapter explores a different social and environmental campaign that OPIRG Peterborough was involved with during the 1990’s. In doing so, the historical evolution of the organization is traced. At the theoretical level, however, the infrastructure of dissent (and its implications for social mobilization) is re-evaluated in every chapter, culminating in a conclusion that posits that the infrastructure of dissent may be more applicable to the study of social movements than Sears originally conceptualized. By contextualizing OPIRG Peterborough as part of a wider student movement in Chapter One, it is seen that the infrastructure of dissent has a professional ‘branch,’ one that is necessary for the survival of grassroots organizations. By analysing the historical development of the Peterborough Ecology Garden in Chapter Two, it is argued that the infrastructure of dissent has the capacity to homogenize the organizational identities of environmental justice organizations that may otherwise appear fractured. In Chapter Three, the capacity for the infrastructure of dissent to foster individual identities within OPIRG Peterborough working groups is discussed. By developing these particular facets of the infrastructure of dissent, it is argued that the infrastructure itself may be key to formulating effective social mobilizations outside of strictly labour-political dichotomies.
Transitional Housing to Prevent and Reduce Youth Homelessness
By Melissa Hunt, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Youth Emergency Shelter; Supervising Professor: May Chazan; Trent Community Research Centre, WMST4820 - Community-Based Research Project

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