Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

Pages

"Immigrant friendly" work environments
This research project was solicited by the New Canadian Centre of Peterborough (NCCP) in order to determine if and to what extent employers and workplaces are immigrant friendly in the City of Peterborough. This particular research will aid in providing current information and recommendations which will direct and inform the current employment counsellor [sic] at the NCCP as to what new innovations and connections must be built., Acronyms -- Executive summary -- 1.0 Background information. 1.1 The changing face of Canada. 1.2 The Peterborough labor market -- 2.0 Research goals and objectives. 2.1 A bit about the host: The New Canadian Center of Peterborough. 2.2 Peterborough's immigrant population -- 3.0 Methodology. 3.1 Conceptual framework. 3.2 The evaluator's role. 3.3 Ethical considerations. 3.4 Research design. 3.5 Literature review. 3.6 Interviews. 3.7 Attendance of applicable community events. 3.8 Survey -- 4.0 Findings. 4.1 Semi-standardized interviews with clients of the NCCP. 4.2 Semi-standardized interviews with employment agencies. 4.3 Survey findings. 4.4 Employers' suggestions for new Canadians seeking work. 4.5 Barriers to employment. 4.6 Programs currently in operation. 4.7 Programs in the near future -- 5.0 Discussion. 5.1 Immigrant friendliness as a criterion. 5.2 Immigrant friendliness of the Peterborough labour market. 5.3 Assumptions and presumptions inhibiting immigrant friendliness. 5.4 Communication and connection. 5.5 Government requirements and incentives. 5.6 Community research focus -- 6.0 Recommendations. 6.1 Better coordination between stakeholders in the local labour market. 6.2 Employer marketing of the necessity for immigrant friendliness. 6.3 More emphasis in personal networks for employment assistance. 6.2 [sic] Building a sense of community. 6.3 [sic] Further research -- 7.0 Conclusions -- References -- Appendices., by Xochilt Hernandez and Emma Taillefer., Completion Date: April 2010., Completed for: New Canadian Centre; Supervising Professor: Chris Beyers, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliography., IDST 422, Assessment of Development Projects.
10 year housing and homelessness plan
by Samantha Darrach., Date of Project Completion: April 2014., Completed for: City of Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Heather Nicol and Peter Lafleur; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliography., GEOG 4030Y.
3 assignments
Laura Anderson. --, Submitted to: TCCBE, ERST 384H, March 30,2001, ERST 384H: Community-Based Research Project.
A Community-Based Approach to Retirement Living Development Projects
By Natalie Jennings, Laurel Pirrie, Kara Rutherford, & Amy Smith, Completed for: Abbeyfield House Society of Lakefield; Supervising Professor: Elizabeth Russell; Trent Community Research Centre, In an era of population aging, many rural communities are investigating alterna- tive living accommodations for older adults. Abbeyfield housing offers a unique, non-profit, community-based, communal-living model that includes private, inde- pendent living space geared towards middle-income seniors. This model has been successful internationally and across Canada including houses in Ottawa, Toronto, Durham, and Caledon. However, before investing in developing this type of non-profit retirement living model, and the social, voluntary-based infrastruc- ture necessary to do so, it is important to thoroughly and accurately understand the local population’s needs and preferences to ensure appropriate and effective retirement housing developments. Focusing on the small rural town of Lakefield, Ontario, this community-based research project examined the needs, prefer- ences, and attitudes of older adults and other community members towards re- tirement living, to determine the feasibility and community desire for the devel- opment of an Abbeyfield house in Lakefield.
A Community-Based Approach to Retirement Living Development Projects [poster]
By Natalie Jennings, Laurel Pirrie, Kara Rutherford, & Amy Smith, Completed for: Abbeyfield House Society of Lakefield; Supervising Professor: Elizabeth Russell; Trent Community Research Centre
A Review of Evaluation Methods & Tools to Measure the Impact of Crime Prevention Through Social Development
The Peterborough Police Service require better evaluation tools for their Crime Prevention through Social Development (CPSD) efforts. There are four research categories driving this project: general understanding of CPSD; tools and methods for evaluating CPSD; personnel conducting the evaluation with specific emphasis on police; and collaboration between police and other organizations. Research was conducted through literature review and administering a survey to police officials throughout Ontario. The literature review and the survey indicated that there is no existing easy measurement system for CPSD due to a dearth of specific evaluation tools. It was discovered that collaboration is important and that there are potential methodologies that could be applied to evaluating CPSD from a variety of disciplines, but nothing specifically created to measure CPSD was found. Where evaluations were taking place, the personnel conducting the evaluation varied but were primarily municipal officials or civilians/third-party organizations. Collaboration is a crucial component for any CPSD measure. Further research into evaluation tools, creating a CPSD working group for Ontario police services, merging ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ policing, conducting longitudinal studies, and creating standardized language are recommended., By Kyle Moes, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Peterborough Police Service; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: John Marris, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
A Review of Evaluation Methods & Tools to Measure the Impact of Crime Prevention Through Social Development [poster]
By Kyle Moes, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Peterborough Police Service; Supervising Professor: Sharon Beaucage-Johnson; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: John Marris, FRSC 4080Y - Community-Based Research Project
A cultural history of Lakefield Lift Lock
The purpose of this project is to document the cultural landscape at the Lakefield Lock Station over the nineteenth and early twentieth century. The project will focus on the development of the lumering industry with emphasis on the early construction and infrastrucutre development in Lakefield and surrounding areas along the Trent Severn Waterway., Abstract -- 1.0 Introduction. 1.1 Key research terms. 1.2 Study area. -- 2.0 Literature review. 2.1 Staples theory. 2.2 Historical geography. 2.3 Historical record. 2.4 Local literature -- 3.0 Methods. 3.1 Archival research. 3.2 Interaction with local historians. 3.3 Primary sources. 3.4 Photographs -- 4.0 Results. 4.1 Key settlers. 4.2 Samuel Dickson. 4.3 Samuel Strickland. 4.4 Cavendish. 4.5 Timber trade. 4.6 Mills. 4.7 Strickland mill. 4.8 Perry mill. 4.9 Cavendish mill. 5.0 Herriot mill. 5.1 Dickson mill -- 6.0 Conclusion -- 7.0 Recommendations -- 8.0 Appendix -- 9.0 Bibliography., By Rebecca Williams. --, Completed for: Parks Canada (Trent Severn Waterway Historical Site). Supervising Professor: Heather Nicol, Trent University. Date of Project Submission: April 2012., Includes bibliography., Geography 4700Y - Community-Based Research in Human Geography.
A feasibility study linking the Kawartha Highlands to the Kawartha Barrens
Introduction -- Signature site -- Definitions -- Methods -- Land use -- Land tenure -- Access points and infrastructure -- Recreational potential -- Socio-economic benefits -- Future conclusions -- References -- Tables -- Maps -- Photographs., by Todd Beehler. --, Presented to Ian Attridge and Allan Brunger, April 6, 2001., Dept. of Geography, Trent University 2000-01, GO 470, Research Seminar in Human Geography., Includes bibliographic references.
A food policy council for Peterborough
by Gordon Caldwell, Amanda Collins, Michelle Kimmett and Aiden Weichula., Date of Project Completion: December 2008., Completed for: Kawartha Food Sustainability Initiative; Supervising Professor: Paula Anderson, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Includes bibliography and appendices., ERST 334H.
A framework to develop an ethical farming scheme in the Peterborough region
Abstract -- Background -- A framework of standards for ethical farming practices in the Peterborough Region -- Recommendations for enforcement -- Branding and recognition -- Implementation options of a farm assurance scheme -- Steps to be taken by the producer to achieve certification -- A general framework to implement and enforce a farm assurance scheme at the producer level -- Conclusion., By John Kenney and John Zoltak., Completed for: Freedom Farms; Supervising Professor: Prof. Ian Attridge, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., Date of project submission: March 29, 2004., Includes bibliographic references., ERSC 316H.
A garden story
"For our project, we were responsible for creating a website for the Trent's vegetable gardens. This is the outline for working on the website which is the only written part we were supposed to do aside from the website." [Pg. 1]., By Diana Kouril, Mary McBride, Heidi Scott, Devon Smith., Completed for: Trent Vegetable Gardens; Supervising Professor: Paula Anderson, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-Based Education., ERST 3340H - The Canadian Food System: A Community Development Approach.

Pages

Simple Search

Query

  • (-) RELS_EXT_isMemberOf_uri_ms:("info:fedora/tula:tcrc" OR "tula:tcrc") OR RELS_EXT_isMemberOfCollection_uri_ms:("info:fedora/tula:tcrc" OR "tula:tcrc")